Effects of and factors associated with umbilical hernias in a swine herd.

R. Searcy-Bernal, Ian Gardner, D. W. Hird

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Of 2,958 pigs from a 320-sow, farrow-to-finish herd that were evaluated from birth to slaughter, 44 (1.5%) developed umbilical hernias. Hernias were detected mostly (34/44) when the pigs were between 9 and 14 weeks of age and were not fatal despite lack of treatment. Among littermates, weight gain prior to weaning was significantly (P = 0.04) lower in pigs that developed hernias (144.7 g/d) by 30 weeks of age than for nonaffected pigs (163.3 g/d), but growth rates from weaning to about 45 kg did not differ significantly. Records of pigs sired by 13 purebred boars were used to evaluate breed-of-sire associations. Pigs sired by American Spotted (n = 19; relative risk [RR] = 8.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.1 to 32.7) and Duroc boars (n = 378; RR = 2.1; 95% CI = 1.0 to 4.5) were more likely to develop umbilical hernias than were pigs (n = 1,644) sired by Yorkshire boars. Umbilical lesions (omphalitis or umbilical abscess) were associated (RR = 7.6; 95% CI = 1.2 to 49.5) with umbilical herniation on an individual basis, but the association was not evident (RR = 1.2; 95% CI = 0.2 to 7.6) when the litter was the unit of analysis. Analysis of sire associations, stratified by umbilical lesion status, indicated increased risks in the nonlesioned stratum for the American Spotted (RR = 8.7) and Duroc sires (RR = 2.2). Adequate comparisons of sire breed in the lesioned stratum could not be made, because umbilical lesions were an infrequent finding (9/2, 958).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1660-1664
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume204
Issue number10
StatePublished - May 15 1994

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umbilicus
Umbilical Hernia
hernia
Umbilicus
relative risk
Swine
herds
swine
sires
confidence interval
boars
Confidence Intervals
Duroc
Hernia
Weaning
lesions (animal)
weaning
breeds
Yorkshire (swine breed)
abscess

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Effects of and factors associated with umbilical hernias in a swine herd. / Searcy-Bernal, R.; Gardner, Ian; Hird, D. W.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 204, No. 10, 15.05.1994, p. 1660-1664.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Of 2,958 pigs from a 320-sow, farrow-to-finish herd that were evaluated from birth to slaughter, 44 (1.5{\%}) developed umbilical hernias. Hernias were detected mostly (34/44) when the pigs were between 9 and 14 weeks of age and were not fatal despite lack of treatment. Among littermates, weight gain prior to weaning was significantly (P = 0.04) lower in pigs that developed hernias (144.7 g/d) by 30 weeks of age than for nonaffected pigs (163.3 g/d), but growth rates from weaning to about 45 kg did not differ significantly. Records of pigs sired by 13 purebred boars were used to evaluate breed-of-sire associations. Pigs sired by American Spotted (n = 19; relative risk [RR] = 8.3; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] = 2.1 to 32.7) and Duroc boars (n = 378; RR = 2.1; 95{\%} CI = 1.0 to 4.5) were more likely to develop umbilical hernias than were pigs (n = 1,644) sired by Yorkshire boars. Umbilical lesions (omphalitis or umbilical abscess) were associated (RR = 7.6; 95{\%} CI = 1.2 to 49.5) with umbilical herniation on an individual basis, but the association was not evident (RR = 1.2; 95{\%} CI = 0.2 to 7.6) when the litter was the unit of analysis. Analysis of sire associations, stratified by umbilical lesion status, indicated increased risks in the nonlesioned stratum for the American Spotted (RR = 8.7) and Duroc sires (RR = 2.2). Adequate comparisons of sire breed in the lesioned stratum could not be made, because umbilical lesions were an infrequent finding (9/2, 958).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)",
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