Effect of weight gain and subsequent weight loss on glucose tolerance and insulin response in healthy cats.

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62 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effects of weight gain and subsequent weight loss on glucose tolerance and insulin response were evaluated in 12 healthy cats. Intravenous glucose tolerance tests (IVGTT) were performed at entry into the study, after a significant gain of body weight induced by feeding palatable commercial cat food ad libitum, after a significant loss of body weight induced by feeding a poorly palatable purified diet to discourage eating and promote fasting, and after recovery from fasting when body weight had returned to pre-study values and cats were eating commercial foods. A complete physical examination with measurement of body weight was performed weekly, a CBC and serum biochemistry panel were evaluated at the time of each IVGTT, and a liver biopsy specimen obtained 2 to 4 days after each IVGTT was evaluated histologically for each cat. Mean serum glucose and insulin concentrations after glucose infusion and total amount of insulin secreted during the second 60 minutes and entire 120 minutes after glucose infusion were significantly (P < .05) increased after weight gain, as compared with baseline. At the end of weight loss, cats had hepatic lipidosis and serum biochemical abnormalities consistent with feline hepatic lipidosis. There was a significant (P < .05) increase in mean serum glucose concentration and t1/2, and a significant (P < .05) decrease in mean serum insulin concentration and the glucose disappearance coefficient (K) after glucose infusion for measurements obtained after weight loss, compared with those obtained after weight gain and at baseline. Insulin peak response, insulinogenic index, and total amount of insulin secreted during the initial 10 minutes, 20 minutes, and 60 minutes after glucose infusion were decreased markedly (P < .05), compared with measurements obtained after weight gain and at baseline. In addition, the total amount of insulin secreted for 120 minutes after glucose infusion was decreased markedly (P < .05) in measurements obtained after weight loss, compared with those obtained after weight gain. At the end of recovery, all cats were voluntarily consuming food, serum biochemical abnormalities identified after weight loss had resolved, the number and size of lipid vacuoles in hepatocytes had decreased, and results of IVGTT were similar to those obtained at baseline. These findings confirmed the reversibility of obesity-induced insulin resistance in cats, and documented initial deterioration in glucose tolerance and insulin response to glucose infusion when weight loss was caused by severe restriction of caloric intake.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)86-91
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of veterinary internal medicine / American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Volume11
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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