Effect of treatment with erythromycin on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cell populations in foals

Jeffrey Lakritz, William D Wilson, Johanna L Watson, Dallas M. Hyde, Judy Mihalyi, Charles Plopper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. To determine whether oral administration of erythromycin alters the inflammatory response to bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in young horses. Animals. 12 healthy, unweaned, mixed-breed foals of either sex, between 2 and 4 months old. Procedure. BAL was performed; 250 ml of phosphate-buffered saline solution (300 mOsm, pH 7.4) was administered in 50-ml aliquots. Foals were carefully monitored for 4 days, then erythromycin base (25 mg/kg of body weight, PO, q 12 h) was given to foals of the treated group. After 4 days, foals were reanesthetized, and the same lung was relavaged. Cytologic examination was performed on BAL fluid (BALF) samples from both groups of foals. At 12 hours after administration of the final dose, erythromycin A and anhydroerythromycin A concentrations were determined in plasma of treated foals. Results. In the second BALF sample from the same lung of control foals, percentage of neutrophils was significantly increased (3 ± 38.0%), compared with that from erythromycin-treated foals (4.88 ± 3.66%, P < 0.05), and was associated with apparent decrease in the ability of BALF cells from erythromycin-treated foals to migrate toward a chemoattractant source. Significantly fewer BALF cells adhered to a cell culture substratum after erythromycin treatment of foals. Erythromycin A was not detected in plasma of any treated foal at the time of the second BAL; anhydroerythromycin A, a degradation product of erythromycin, was detected in plasma of 5 of 6 foals (mean concentration, 0.2 ± 0.06 μg/ml). Conclusion and Clinical Relevance. BAL induces neutrophilic inflammation, which persists for at least 4 days in the lungs of young horses. Erythromycin (25 mg/kg, PO, q 12 h) diminishes this inflammatory response through a mechanism that may involve alteration of BALF cell function. Degradation of erythromycin to biologically active products or presence of parent drug in pulmonary secretions may be responsible for alterations in pulmonary lavage cell chemotaxis and adherence. Erythromycin administered orally to foals at clinically relevant doses appears to have nonantimicrobial effects that may interfere with host cell metabolism and decrease inflammatory reponses in airways.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)56-61
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume58
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1997

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erythromycin
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid
Erythromycin
foals
Bronchoalveolar Lavage
Dimercaprol
Population
cells
lungs
Therapeutics
Lung
inflammation
Horses
fluids
Aptitude
Chemotactic Factors
horses
Chemotaxis
chemoattractants
degradation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Effect of treatment with erythromycin on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cell populations in foals. / Lakritz, Jeffrey; Wilson, William D; Watson, Johanna L; Hyde, Dallas M.; Mihalyi, Judy; Plopper, Charles.

In: American Journal of Veterinary Research, Vol. 58, No. 1, 1997, p. 56-61.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Effect of treatment with erythromycin on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cell populations in foals",
abstract = "Objective. To determine whether oral administration of erythromycin alters the inflammatory response to bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in young horses. Animals. 12 healthy, unweaned, mixed-breed foals of either sex, between 2 and 4 months old. Procedure. BAL was performed; 250 ml of phosphate-buffered saline solution (300 mOsm, pH 7.4) was administered in 50-ml aliquots. Foals were carefully monitored for 4 days, then erythromycin base (25 mg/kg of body weight, PO, q 12 h) was given to foals of the treated group. After 4 days, foals were reanesthetized, and the same lung was relavaged. Cytologic examination was performed on BAL fluid (BALF) samples from both groups of foals. At 12 hours after administration of the final dose, erythromycin A and anhydroerythromycin A concentrations were determined in plasma of treated foals. Results. In the second BALF sample from the same lung of control foals, percentage of neutrophils was significantly increased (3 ± 38.0{\%}), compared with that from erythromycin-treated foals (4.88 ± 3.66{\%}, P < 0.05), and was associated with apparent decrease in the ability of BALF cells from erythromycin-treated foals to migrate toward a chemoattractant source. Significantly fewer BALF cells adhered to a cell culture substratum after erythromycin treatment of foals. Erythromycin A was not detected in plasma of any treated foal at the time of the second BAL; anhydroerythromycin A, a degradation product of erythromycin, was detected in plasma of 5 of 6 foals (mean concentration, 0.2 ± 0.06 μg/ml). Conclusion and Clinical Relevance. BAL induces neutrophilic inflammation, which persists for at least 4 days in the lungs of young horses. Erythromycin (25 mg/kg, PO, q 12 h) diminishes this inflammatory response through a mechanism that may involve alteration of BALF cell function. Degradation of erythromycin to biologically active products or presence of parent drug in pulmonary secretions may be responsible for alterations in pulmonary lavage cell chemotaxis and adherence. Erythromycin administered orally to foals at clinically relevant doses appears to have nonantimicrobial effects that may interfere with host cell metabolism and decrease inflammatory reponses in airways.",
author = "Jeffrey Lakritz and Wilson, {William D} and Watson, {Johanna L} and Hyde, {Dallas M.} and Judy Mihalyi and Charles Plopper",
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T1 - Effect of treatment with erythromycin on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cell populations in foals

AU - Lakritz, Jeffrey

AU - Wilson, William D

AU - Watson, Johanna L

AU - Hyde, Dallas M.

AU - Mihalyi, Judy

AU - Plopper, Charles

PY - 1997

Y1 - 1997

N2 - Objective. To determine whether oral administration of erythromycin alters the inflammatory response to bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in young horses. Animals. 12 healthy, unweaned, mixed-breed foals of either sex, between 2 and 4 months old. Procedure. BAL was performed; 250 ml of phosphate-buffered saline solution (300 mOsm, pH 7.4) was administered in 50-ml aliquots. Foals were carefully monitored for 4 days, then erythromycin base (25 mg/kg of body weight, PO, q 12 h) was given to foals of the treated group. After 4 days, foals were reanesthetized, and the same lung was relavaged. Cytologic examination was performed on BAL fluid (BALF) samples from both groups of foals. At 12 hours after administration of the final dose, erythromycin A and anhydroerythromycin A concentrations were determined in plasma of treated foals. Results. In the second BALF sample from the same lung of control foals, percentage of neutrophils was significantly increased (3 ± 38.0%), compared with that from erythromycin-treated foals (4.88 ± 3.66%, P < 0.05), and was associated with apparent decrease in the ability of BALF cells from erythromycin-treated foals to migrate toward a chemoattractant source. Significantly fewer BALF cells adhered to a cell culture substratum after erythromycin treatment of foals. Erythromycin A was not detected in plasma of any treated foal at the time of the second BAL; anhydroerythromycin A, a degradation product of erythromycin, was detected in plasma of 5 of 6 foals (mean concentration, 0.2 ± 0.06 μg/ml). Conclusion and Clinical Relevance. BAL induces neutrophilic inflammation, which persists for at least 4 days in the lungs of young horses. Erythromycin (25 mg/kg, PO, q 12 h) diminishes this inflammatory response through a mechanism that may involve alteration of BALF cell function. Degradation of erythromycin to biologically active products or presence of parent drug in pulmonary secretions may be responsible for alterations in pulmonary lavage cell chemotaxis and adherence. Erythromycin administered orally to foals at clinically relevant doses appears to have nonantimicrobial effects that may interfere with host cell metabolism and decrease inflammatory reponses in airways.

AB - Objective. To determine whether oral administration of erythromycin alters the inflammatory response to bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in young horses. Animals. 12 healthy, unweaned, mixed-breed foals of either sex, between 2 and 4 months old. Procedure. BAL was performed; 250 ml of phosphate-buffered saline solution (300 mOsm, pH 7.4) was administered in 50-ml aliquots. Foals were carefully monitored for 4 days, then erythromycin base (25 mg/kg of body weight, PO, q 12 h) was given to foals of the treated group. After 4 days, foals were reanesthetized, and the same lung was relavaged. Cytologic examination was performed on BAL fluid (BALF) samples from both groups of foals. At 12 hours after administration of the final dose, erythromycin A and anhydroerythromycin A concentrations were determined in plasma of treated foals. Results. In the second BALF sample from the same lung of control foals, percentage of neutrophils was significantly increased (3 ± 38.0%), compared with that from erythromycin-treated foals (4.88 ± 3.66%, P < 0.05), and was associated with apparent decrease in the ability of BALF cells from erythromycin-treated foals to migrate toward a chemoattractant source. Significantly fewer BALF cells adhered to a cell culture substratum after erythromycin treatment of foals. Erythromycin A was not detected in plasma of any treated foal at the time of the second BAL; anhydroerythromycin A, a degradation product of erythromycin, was detected in plasma of 5 of 6 foals (mean concentration, 0.2 ± 0.06 μg/ml). Conclusion and Clinical Relevance. BAL induces neutrophilic inflammation, which persists for at least 4 days in the lungs of young horses. Erythromycin (25 mg/kg, PO, q 12 h) diminishes this inflammatory response through a mechanism that may involve alteration of BALF cell function. Degradation of erythromycin to biologically active products or presence of parent drug in pulmonary secretions may be responsible for alterations in pulmonary lavage cell chemotaxis and adherence. Erythromycin administered orally to foals at clinically relevant doses appears to have nonantimicrobial effects that may interfere with host cell metabolism and decrease inflammatory reponses in airways.

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