Effect of Screening Abdominal Ultrasound Examination on the Decision to Pursue Advanced Diagnostic Tests and Treatment in Dogs with Neurologic Disease

N. M. Tong, Allison Zwingenberger, W. H. Blair, S. L. Taylor, R. X. Chen, Beverly Sturges

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Abdominal ultrasound examinations (AUS) are commonly performed before advanced neurodiagnostics to screen for diseases that might affect diagnostic plans and prognosis. Objectives: Describe the type and frequency of abnormalities found by AUS in dogs presenting with a neurological condition, identify risk factors associated with abnormalities, and evaluate treatment decisions based on findings. Animals: Seven hundred and fifty-nine hospitalized dogs. Methods: Retrospective study. Medical records of dogs presented from 2007 to 2009 for neurologic disease were searched for signalment, neuroanatomic localization, and AUS findings. Whether dogs had advanced neurodiagnostics and treatment was analyzed. Results: Fifty-eight percent of dogs had abnormal findings on AUS. Probability of abnormalities increased with age (P < 0.001). Nondachshund breeds had higher probability of abnormal AUS than dachshunds (odds ratio [OR] = 1.87). Eleven percent of dogs did not have advanced neurodiagnostics and in 1.3%, this was because of abnormal AUS. Dogs with ultrasonographic abnormalities were less likely than dogs without to have advanced neurodiagnostics (OR = 0.3 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.17, 0.52]), however, the probability of performing advanced diagnostics was high regardless of normal (OR = 0.95 [95% CI: 0.92, 0.97]) or abnormal (OR = 0.85 [95% CI: 0.81, 0.88]) AUS. Treatment was more often pursued in small dogs and less often in dogs with brain disease. Conclusions and Clinical Importance: Findings from screening AUS had a small negative effect on the likelihood of pursuing advanced neurodiagnostics. Although it should be included in the extracranial diagnostic workup in dogs with significant history or physical examination abnormalities, AUS is considered a low-yield diagnostic test in young dogs and dachshunds.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)893-899
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2015

Fingerprint

nervous system diseases
Nervous System Diseases
Routine Diagnostic Tests
diagnostic techniques
Dogs
screening
dogs
odds ratio
Odds Ratio
Dachshund
confidence interval
Confidence Intervals
central nervous system diseases
Brain Diseases
retrospective studies
clinical examination
prognosis
Physical Examination
Medical Records
risk factors

Keywords

  • Computed tomography
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Myelogram
  • Ultrasonography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Effect of Screening Abdominal Ultrasound Examination on the Decision to Pursue Advanced Diagnostic Tests and Treatment in Dogs with Neurologic Disease. / Tong, N. M.; Zwingenberger, Allison; Blair, W. H.; Taylor, S. L.; Chen, R. X.; Sturges, Beverly.

In: Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Vol. 29, No. 3, 01.05.2015, p. 893-899.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Abdominal ultrasound examinations (AUS) are commonly performed before advanced neurodiagnostics to screen for diseases that might affect diagnostic plans and prognosis. Objectives: Describe the type and frequency of abnormalities found by AUS in dogs presenting with a neurological condition, identify risk factors associated with abnormalities, and evaluate treatment decisions based on findings. Animals: Seven hundred and fifty-nine hospitalized dogs. Methods: Retrospective study. Medical records of dogs presented from 2007 to 2009 for neurologic disease were searched for signalment, neuroanatomic localization, and AUS findings. Whether dogs had advanced neurodiagnostics and treatment was analyzed. Results: Fifty-eight percent of dogs had abnormal findings on AUS. Probability of abnormalities increased with age (P < 0.001). Nondachshund breeds had higher probability of abnormal AUS than dachshunds (odds ratio [OR] = 1.87). Eleven percent of dogs did not have advanced neurodiagnostics and in 1.3{\%}, this was because of abnormal AUS. Dogs with ultrasonographic abnormalities were less likely than dogs without to have advanced neurodiagnostics (OR = 0.3 [95{\%} confidence interval [CI]: 0.17, 0.52]), however, the probability of performing advanced diagnostics was high regardless of normal (OR = 0.95 [95{\%} CI: 0.92, 0.97]) or abnormal (OR = 0.85 [95{\%} CI: 0.81, 0.88]) AUS. Treatment was more often pursued in small dogs and less often in dogs with brain disease. Conclusions and Clinical Importance: Findings from screening AUS had a small negative effect on the likelihood of pursuing advanced neurodiagnostics. Although it should be included in the extracranial diagnostic workup in dogs with significant history or physical examination abnormalities, AUS is considered a low-yield diagnostic test in young dogs and dachshunds.",
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AU - Chen, R. X.

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N2 - Background: Abdominal ultrasound examinations (AUS) are commonly performed before advanced neurodiagnostics to screen for diseases that might affect diagnostic plans and prognosis. Objectives: Describe the type and frequency of abnormalities found by AUS in dogs presenting with a neurological condition, identify risk factors associated with abnormalities, and evaluate treatment decisions based on findings. Animals: Seven hundred and fifty-nine hospitalized dogs. Methods: Retrospective study. Medical records of dogs presented from 2007 to 2009 for neurologic disease were searched for signalment, neuroanatomic localization, and AUS findings. Whether dogs had advanced neurodiagnostics and treatment was analyzed. Results: Fifty-eight percent of dogs had abnormal findings on AUS. Probability of abnormalities increased with age (P < 0.001). Nondachshund breeds had higher probability of abnormal AUS than dachshunds (odds ratio [OR] = 1.87). Eleven percent of dogs did not have advanced neurodiagnostics and in 1.3%, this was because of abnormal AUS. Dogs with ultrasonographic abnormalities were less likely than dogs without to have advanced neurodiagnostics (OR = 0.3 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.17, 0.52]), however, the probability of performing advanced diagnostics was high regardless of normal (OR = 0.95 [95% CI: 0.92, 0.97]) or abnormal (OR = 0.85 [95% CI: 0.81, 0.88]) AUS. Treatment was more often pursued in small dogs and less often in dogs with brain disease. Conclusions and Clinical Importance: Findings from screening AUS had a small negative effect on the likelihood of pursuing advanced neurodiagnostics. Although it should be included in the extracranial diagnostic workup in dogs with significant history or physical examination abnormalities, AUS is considered a low-yield diagnostic test in young dogs and dachshunds.

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