Effect of proteasome inhibitor 1 on wound healing

A potential scar prevention therapy

John A. Walker, Gianni Rossini, Michelle W. Thompson, Joseph C. Wenke, David Baer, Matthew Q. Pompeo, Bobby Dezfuli, Chin-Shang Li, J Nilas Young, Michael S Wong, John F. Tarlton, Hugh S. Munro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In vitro and in vivo assessments suggest that proteasome inhibitors may be useful for modulating wound healing. Methods. Proteasome Inhibitor I was used to assess the potential utility of proteasome inhibitors in improving wound healing in a standard rat model. Bilateral, 6 cm incisions were made 1 cm lateral to the spine of adult male Sprague Dawley rats. Animals were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: no treatment (n ≤ 15), low concentration (1% w/v, n ≤ 15), or high concentration (5% w/v, n ≤ 15). Treatments were applied to the left side incision at 0 hours, 24 hours, and 48 hours. Right-side incisionsreceived a vehicle, dimethyl sulfoxide, alone and independent of the assigned group, serving as both external and internal controls. Rats were sacrificed at days 7, 14, and 28 (n ≤ 5 per group) and wounds subjected to mechanical testing and histology. Results. No significant intergroup difference existed at 7 and 14 days. On day 28, a dosedependent increase in tensile strength with increasing Proteasome Inhibitor I was observed. Conclusion. Results suggest dimethyl sulfoxide was not the ideal vehicle and additional improvement may be realized by optimizing the delivery method.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)28-33
Number of pages6
JournalWounds
Volume25
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 2013

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Proteasome Inhibitors
Dimethyl Sulfoxide
Wound Healing
Cicatrix
Internal-External Control
Tensile Strength
Sprague Dawley Rats
Histology
Spine
Wounds and Injuries
Therapeutics
benzyloxycarbonyl-isoleucyl-glutamyl(O-tert-butyl)-alanyl-leucinal
In Vitro Techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Medical–Surgical

Cite this

Walker, J. A., Rossini, G., Thompson, M. W., Wenke, J. C., Baer, D., Pompeo, M. Q., ... Munro, H. S. (2013). Effect of proteasome inhibitor 1 on wound healing: A potential scar prevention therapy. Wounds, 25(2), 28-33.

Effect of proteasome inhibitor 1 on wound healing : A potential scar prevention therapy. / Walker, John A.; Rossini, Gianni; Thompson, Michelle W.; Wenke, Joseph C.; Baer, David; Pompeo, Matthew Q.; Dezfuli, Bobby; Li, Chin-Shang; Young, J Nilas; Wong, Michael S; Tarlton, John F.; Munro, Hugh S.

In: Wounds, Vol. 25, No. 2, 02.2013, p. 28-33.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Walker, JA, Rossini, G, Thompson, MW, Wenke, JC, Baer, D, Pompeo, MQ, Dezfuli, B, Li, C-S, Young, JN, Wong, MS, Tarlton, JF & Munro, HS 2013, 'Effect of proteasome inhibitor 1 on wound healing: A potential scar prevention therapy', Wounds, vol. 25, no. 2, pp. 28-33.
Walker JA, Rossini G, Thompson MW, Wenke JC, Baer D, Pompeo MQ et al. Effect of proteasome inhibitor 1 on wound healing: A potential scar prevention therapy. Wounds. 2013 Feb;25(2):28-33.
Walker, John A. ; Rossini, Gianni ; Thompson, Michelle W. ; Wenke, Joseph C. ; Baer, David ; Pompeo, Matthew Q. ; Dezfuli, Bobby ; Li, Chin-Shang ; Young, J Nilas ; Wong, Michael S ; Tarlton, John F. ; Munro, Hugh S. / Effect of proteasome inhibitor 1 on wound healing : A potential scar prevention therapy. In: Wounds. 2013 ; Vol. 25, No. 2. pp. 28-33.
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