Effect of petrolatum coating on the rate of occlusion of ameroid constrictors in the peritoneal cavity

Christopher A. Adin, Clare R. Gregory, Andrew E. Kyles, Stephen M Griffey, Lon Kendall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To document rate of closure and degree of inflammation associated with petrolatum coated (PCA) and non-coated ameroid constrictors (NCA) in the peritoneal cavity. Study Design - Experimental study. Animals - 18 Sprague-Dawley rats. Methods - Thirty-six ameroid constrictors (AC; 5mm) were digitally scanned and luminal area measured. Rats were anesthetized, and 1 PCA and 1 NCA were inserted in the peritoneal cavity by median celiotomy. Rats were euthanatized at 2 weeks (6 rats), 4 weeks (6), or 6 weeks (6) after surgery. AC were harvested, digitally scanned, and luminal area determined. Inflammation associated with the AC was subjectively graded (1-5). The effects of petrolatum coating on luminal area measurements and inflammatory score were statistically analyzed. Results - Closure of AC occurred most rapidly during the first 2 weeks, but luminal area decreased only 32% at 6 weeks after implantation. There was no significant difference in rate of closure for PCA compared to NCA at 2, 4, or 6 weeks. Inflammation scores were not significantly different between PCA and NCA. Conclusions - Petrolatum coating did not slow the rate of closure of AC in the peritoneal cavity. Clinical Relevance - The lack of closure of AC supports the conclusion that vascular attenuation is not dependent on luminal constriction alone. Petrolatum coating did not slow the rate of casein expansion and is unlikely to be clinically useful.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)11-16
Number of pages6
JournalVeterinary Surgery
Volume33
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2004

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petrolatum
Petrolatum
Peritoneal Cavity
coatings
inflammation
rats
Inflammation
Caseins
ameroid
blood vessels
Constriction
Blood Vessels
Sprague Dawley Rats
casein
Research Design
surgery
experimental design

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Effect of petrolatum coating on the rate of occlusion of ameroid constrictors in the peritoneal cavity. / Adin, Christopher A.; Gregory, Clare R.; Kyles, Andrew E.; Griffey, Stephen M; Kendall, Lon.

In: Veterinary Surgery, Vol. 33, No. 1, 01.2004, p. 11-16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Adin, Christopher A. ; Gregory, Clare R. ; Kyles, Andrew E. ; Griffey, Stephen M ; Kendall, Lon. / Effect of petrolatum coating on the rate of occlusion of ameroid constrictors in the peritoneal cavity. In: Veterinary Surgery. 2004 ; Vol. 33, No. 1. pp. 11-16.
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N2 - Objective - To document rate of closure and degree of inflammation associated with petrolatum coated (PCA) and non-coated ameroid constrictors (NCA) in the peritoneal cavity. Study Design - Experimental study. Animals - 18 Sprague-Dawley rats. Methods - Thirty-six ameroid constrictors (AC; 5mm) were digitally scanned and luminal area measured. Rats were anesthetized, and 1 PCA and 1 NCA were inserted in the peritoneal cavity by median celiotomy. Rats were euthanatized at 2 weeks (6 rats), 4 weeks (6), or 6 weeks (6) after surgery. AC were harvested, digitally scanned, and luminal area determined. Inflammation associated with the AC was subjectively graded (1-5). The effects of petrolatum coating on luminal area measurements and inflammatory score were statistically analyzed. Results - Closure of AC occurred most rapidly during the first 2 weeks, but luminal area decreased only 32% at 6 weeks after implantation. There was no significant difference in rate of closure for PCA compared to NCA at 2, 4, or 6 weeks. Inflammation scores were not significantly different between PCA and NCA. Conclusions - Petrolatum coating did not slow the rate of closure of AC in the peritoneal cavity. Clinical Relevance - The lack of closure of AC supports the conclusion that vascular attenuation is not dependent on luminal constriction alone. Petrolatum coating did not slow the rate of casein expansion and is unlikely to be clinically useful.

AB - Objective - To document rate of closure and degree of inflammation associated with petrolatum coated (PCA) and non-coated ameroid constrictors (NCA) in the peritoneal cavity. Study Design - Experimental study. Animals - 18 Sprague-Dawley rats. Methods - Thirty-six ameroid constrictors (AC; 5mm) were digitally scanned and luminal area measured. Rats were anesthetized, and 1 PCA and 1 NCA were inserted in the peritoneal cavity by median celiotomy. Rats were euthanatized at 2 weeks (6 rats), 4 weeks (6), or 6 weeks (6) after surgery. AC were harvested, digitally scanned, and luminal area determined. Inflammation associated with the AC was subjectively graded (1-5). The effects of petrolatum coating on luminal area measurements and inflammatory score were statistically analyzed. Results - Closure of AC occurred most rapidly during the first 2 weeks, but luminal area decreased only 32% at 6 weeks after implantation. There was no significant difference in rate of closure for PCA compared to NCA at 2, 4, or 6 weeks. Inflammation scores were not significantly different between PCA and NCA. Conclusions - Petrolatum coating did not slow the rate of closure of AC in the peritoneal cavity. Clinical Relevance - The lack of closure of AC supports the conclusion that vascular attenuation is not dependent on luminal constriction alone. Petrolatum coating did not slow the rate of casein expansion and is unlikely to be clinically useful.

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