Effect of overweight/obesity on recovery after post-infectious glomerulonephritis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Children with post-infectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN) rapidly recover and have excellent long-term outcomes. After encountering several overweight/obese children with persistent urinary abnormalities during recovery from PIGN, we conducted this retrospective study to determine if overweight/obese status prolonged time to resolution of renal abnormalities after PIGN. Methods: Records of 20 children with PSGN evaluated between 1/98 and 12/ 05 were abstracted for demographics, clinical and laboratory data. Primary outcome measures were time to resolution of hypertension, proteinuria, microhematuria, and low complement C3. The effect of overweight/obese status on outcomes was determined using Kaplan Meier Survival and the log-rank test. Results: The median age was 8 years; 30% were overweight/obese. At presentation, 17 (85%) were hypertensive, 10 (50%) had impaired glomerular filtration (GFR), and 18 (90%) had proteinuria. At last follow-up (median 2.8 months) 12% had hypertension, 55% had microhematuria, 5% had proteinuria but none had low GFR. Median time to normalize was: 30 days (GFR), 45 days (blood pressure), 6 weeks (C3) and 6 months (microhematuria). Log rank test showed that proteinuria-, hypertension-, and hematuria-free survival were all lower in children who were overweight/obese although none of the differences were statistically significant. Time to normalization of C3 was shorter in obese/overweight children. Conclusion: In conclusion, overweight/obese children appear to have greater residual renal injury after PIGN. The earlier C3 normalization in overweight/obese children may indicate that the adverse effect of weight on recovery is from hemodynamic rather than inflammatory factors. Close follow-up of overweight/obese children who develop PIGN is warranted to ensure optimal long-term outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)632-636
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Nephrology
Volume71
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 2009

Fingerprint

Glomerulonephritis
Obesity
Proteinuria
Hypertension
Kidney
Complement C3
Hematuria
Retrospective Studies
Hemodynamics
Demography
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Blood Pressure
Weights and Measures
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Body mass index
  • Glomerulonephritis
  • Hematuria
  • Hypertension residual renal injury
  • Obesity
  • Proteinuria

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

Cite this

Effect of overweight/obesity on recovery after post-infectious glomerulonephritis. / Lee, M. N.; Shaikh, Ulfat; Butani, Lavjay.

In: Clinical Nephrology, Vol. 71, No. 6, 06.2009, p. 632-636.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{90a219f5048e45d4910cd937da928cf3,
title = "Effect of overweight/obesity on recovery after post-infectious glomerulonephritis",
abstract = "Background: Children with post-infectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN) rapidly recover and have excellent long-term outcomes. After encountering several overweight/obese children with persistent urinary abnormalities during recovery from PIGN, we conducted this retrospective study to determine if overweight/obese status prolonged time to resolution of renal abnormalities after PIGN. Methods: Records of 20 children with PSGN evaluated between 1/98 and 12/ 05 were abstracted for demographics, clinical and laboratory data. Primary outcome measures were time to resolution of hypertension, proteinuria, microhematuria, and low complement C3. The effect of overweight/obese status on outcomes was determined using Kaplan Meier Survival and the log-rank test. Results: The median age was 8 years; 30{\%} were overweight/obese. At presentation, 17 (85{\%}) were hypertensive, 10 (50{\%}) had impaired glomerular filtration (GFR), and 18 (90{\%}) had proteinuria. At last follow-up (median 2.8 months) 12{\%} had hypertension, 55{\%} had microhematuria, 5{\%} had proteinuria but none had low GFR. Median time to normalize was: 30 days (GFR), 45 days (blood pressure), 6 weeks (C3) and 6 months (microhematuria). Log rank test showed that proteinuria-, hypertension-, and hematuria-free survival were all lower in children who were overweight/obese although none of the differences were statistically significant. Time to normalization of C3 was shorter in obese/overweight children. Conclusion: In conclusion, overweight/obese children appear to have greater residual renal injury after PIGN. The earlier C3 normalization in overweight/obese children may indicate that the adverse effect of weight on recovery is from hemodynamic rather than inflammatory factors. Close follow-up of overweight/obese children who develop PIGN is warranted to ensure optimal long-term outcomes.",
keywords = "Body mass index, Glomerulonephritis, Hematuria, Hypertension residual renal injury, Obesity, Proteinuria",
author = "Lee, {M. N.} and Ulfat Shaikh and Lavjay Butani",
year = "2009",
month = "6",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "71",
pages = "632--636",
journal = "Clinical Nephrology",
issn = "0301-0430",
publisher = "Dustri-Verlag Dr. Karl Feistle",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of overweight/obesity on recovery after post-infectious glomerulonephritis

AU - Lee, M. N.

AU - Shaikh, Ulfat

AU - Butani, Lavjay

PY - 2009/6

Y1 - 2009/6

N2 - Background: Children with post-infectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN) rapidly recover and have excellent long-term outcomes. After encountering several overweight/obese children with persistent urinary abnormalities during recovery from PIGN, we conducted this retrospective study to determine if overweight/obese status prolonged time to resolution of renal abnormalities after PIGN. Methods: Records of 20 children with PSGN evaluated between 1/98 and 12/ 05 were abstracted for demographics, clinical and laboratory data. Primary outcome measures were time to resolution of hypertension, proteinuria, microhematuria, and low complement C3. The effect of overweight/obese status on outcomes was determined using Kaplan Meier Survival and the log-rank test. Results: The median age was 8 years; 30% were overweight/obese. At presentation, 17 (85%) were hypertensive, 10 (50%) had impaired glomerular filtration (GFR), and 18 (90%) had proteinuria. At last follow-up (median 2.8 months) 12% had hypertension, 55% had microhematuria, 5% had proteinuria but none had low GFR. Median time to normalize was: 30 days (GFR), 45 days (blood pressure), 6 weeks (C3) and 6 months (microhematuria). Log rank test showed that proteinuria-, hypertension-, and hematuria-free survival were all lower in children who were overweight/obese although none of the differences were statistically significant. Time to normalization of C3 was shorter in obese/overweight children. Conclusion: In conclusion, overweight/obese children appear to have greater residual renal injury after PIGN. The earlier C3 normalization in overweight/obese children may indicate that the adverse effect of weight on recovery is from hemodynamic rather than inflammatory factors. Close follow-up of overweight/obese children who develop PIGN is warranted to ensure optimal long-term outcomes.

AB - Background: Children with post-infectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN) rapidly recover and have excellent long-term outcomes. After encountering several overweight/obese children with persistent urinary abnormalities during recovery from PIGN, we conducted this retrospective study to determine if overweight/obese status prolonged time to resolution of renal abnormalities after PIGN. Methods: Records of 20 children with PSGN evaluated between 1/98 and 12/ 05 were abstracted for demographics, clinical and laboratory data. Primary outcome measures were time to resolution of hypertension, proteinuria, microhematuria, and low complement C3. The effect of overweight/obese status on outcomes was determined using Kaplan Meier Survival and the log-rank test. Results: The median age was 8 years; 30% were overweight/obese. At presentation, 17 (85%) were hypertensive, 10 (50%) had impaired glomerular filtration (GFR), and 18 (90%) had proteinuria. At last follow-up (median 2.8 months) 12% had hypertension, 55% had microhematuria, 5% had proteinuria but none had low GFR. Median time to normalize was: 30 days (GFR), 45 days (blood pressure), 6 weeks (C3) and 6 months (microhematuria). Log rank test showed that proteinuria-, hypertension-, and hematuria-free survival were all lower in children who were overweight/obese although none of the differences were statistically significant. Time to normalization of C3 was shorter in obese/overweight children. Conclusion: In conclusion, overweight/obese children appear to have greater residual renal injury after PIGN. The earlier C3 normalization in overweight/obese children may indicate that the adverse effect of weight on recovery is from hemodynamic rather than inflammatory factors. Close follow-up of overweight/obese children who develop PIGN is warranted to ensure optimal long-term outcomes.

KW - Body mass index

KW - Glomerulonephritis

KW - Hematuria

KW - Hypertension residual renal injury

KW - Obesity

KW - Proteinuria

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=67651068681&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=67651068681&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 19473631

AN - SCOPUS:67651068681

VL - 71

SP - 632

EP - 636

JO - Clinical Nephrology

JF - Clinical Nephrology

SN - 0301-0430

IS - 6

ER -