Effect of non-adrenal illness, anaesthesia and surgery on plasma cortisol concentrations in dogs

D. B. Church, A. I. Nicholson, Jan Ilkiw, D. R. Emslie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Basal plasma cortisol concentrations in 25 dogs with non-adrenal illness were two to three times higher than in 25 normal dogs (158 ± 25 nmol litre-1 compared with 65 ± 22; mean ± sd). In addition, plasma cortisol concentrations were measured in 12 animals undergoing major abdominal, thoracic or orthopaedic surgery and compared to a group of six anaesthetised dogs. Anaesthesia alone failed to significantly alter plasma cortisol levels, however, all forms of surgery produced a significant increase in plasma cortisol concentration which returned to normal 24 hours after completion of surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)129-131
Number of pages3
JournalResearch in Veterinary Science
Volume56
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

cortisol
Hydrocortisone
anesthesia
Anesthesia
surgery
Dogs
dogs
orthopedics
chest
Thoracic Surgery
Orthopedics
animals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Effect of non-adrenal illness, anaesthesia and surgery on plasma cortisol concentrations in dogs. / Church, D. B.; Nicholson, A. I.; Ilkiw, Jan; Emslie, D. R.

In: Research in Veterinary Science, Vol. 56, No. 1, 1994, p. 129-131.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Church, D. B. ; Nicholson, A. I. ; Ilkiw, Jan ; Emslie, D. R. / Effect of non-adrenal illness, anaesthesia and surgery on plasma cortisol concentrations in dogs. In: Research in Veterinary Science. 1994 ; Vol. 56, No. 1. pp. 129-131.
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