Effect of fentanyl on the induction dose and minimum infusion rate of alfaxalone preventing movement in dogs

Katherine J. Bennett, Reza Seddighi, Kaitlin A. Moorhead, Kristin Messenger, Sherry K. Cox, Xiaocun Sun, Kirby Pasloske, Bruno H Pypendop, Thomas J. Doherty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine the effect of fentanyl on the induction dose and minimum infusion rate of alfaxalone required to prevent movement in response to a noxious stimulus (MIRNM) in dogs. Study design: Experimental crossover design. Animals: A group of six healthy, adult, intact female mixed-breed dogs, weighing 19.7 ± 1.3 kg. Methods: Dogs were randomly administered one of three treatments at weekly intervals: premedication with 0.9% saline (treatment A), fentanyl 5 μg kg–1 (treatment ALF) or fentanyl 10 μg kg–1 (treatment AHF), administered intravenously over 5 minutes. Anesthesia was induced 5 minutes later with incremental doses of alfaxalone to achieve intubation and was maintained for 90 minutes in A with alfaxalone (0.12 mg kg–1 minute–1), in ALF with alfaxalone (0.09 mg kg–1 minute–1) and fentanyl (0.1 μg kg–1 minute–1) and in AHF with alfaxalone (0.06 mg kg–1 minute–1) and fentanyl (0.2 μg kg–1 minute–1). The alfaxalone infusion was increased or decreased by 0.006 mg kg–1 minute–1 based on positive or negative response to antebrachium stimulation (50 V, 50 Hz, 10 ms). Data were analyzed using a mixed-model ANOVA and presented as least squares means ± standard error. Results: Alfaxalone induction doses were 3.50 ± 0.13 (A), 2.17 ± 0.10 (ALF) and 1.67 ± 0.10 mg kg–1 (AHF) and differed among treatments (p < 0.05). Alfaxalone MIRNM was 0.17 ± 0.01 (A), 0.10 ± 0.01 (ALF) and 0.07 ± 0.01 mg kg–1 minute–1 (AHF) and differed among treatments. ALF and AHF decreased the MIRNM by 44 ± 8% and 62 ± 5%, respectively (p < 0.05). Plasma alfaxalone concentrations at MIRNM were 5.82 ± 0.48 (A), 4.40 ± 0.34 (ALF) and 2.28 ± 0.09 μg mL–1 (AHF). Conclusions and clinical relevance: Fentanyl, at the doses studied, significantly decreased the alfaxalone induction dose and MIRNM.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalVeterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

fentanyl
Fentanyl
Dogs
dogs
dosage
Therapeutics
alphaxalone
least squares
anesthesia
analysis of variance
experimental design
Premedication
Least-Squares Analysis
Intubation
Forearm
Cross-Over Studies
Analysis of Variance
Research Design
Anesthesia
animals

Keywords

  • alfaxalone
  • anesthesia
  • dogs
  • fentanyl
  • minimum infusion rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Bennett, K. J., Seddighi, R., Moorhead, K. A., Messenger, K., Cox, S. K., Sun, X., ... Doherty, T. J. (Accepted/In press). Effect of fentanyl on the induction dose and minimum infusion rate of alfaxalone preventing movement in dogs. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaa.2018.10.006

Effect of fentanyl on the induction dose and minimum infusion rate of alfaxalone preventing movement in dogs. / Bennett, Katherine J.; Seddighi, Reza; Moorhead, Kaitlin A.; Messenger, Kristin; Cox, Sherry K.; Sun, Xiaocun; Pasloske, Kirby; Pypendop, Bruno H; Doherty, Thomas J.

In: Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bennett, Katherine J. ; Seddighi, Reza ; Moorhead, Kaitlin A. ; Messenger, Kristin ; Cox, Sherry K. ; Sun, Xiaocun ; Pasloske, Kirby ; Pypendop, Bruno H ; Doherty, Thomas J. / Effect of fentanyl on the induction dose and minimum infusion rate of alfaxalone preventing movement in dogs. In: Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia. 2018.
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abstract = "Objective: To determine the effect of fentanyl on the induction dose and minimum infusion rate of alfaxalone required to prevent movement in response to a noxious stimulus (MIRNM) in dogs. Study design: Experimental crossover design. Animals: A group of six healthy, adult, intact female mixed-breed dogs, weighing 19.7 ± 1.3 kg. Methods: Dogs were randomly administered one of three treatments at weekly intervals: premedication with 0.9{\%} saline (treatment A), fentanyl 5 μg kg–1 (treatment ALF) or fentanyl 10 μg kg–1 (treatment AHF), administered intravenously over 5 minutes. Anesthesia was induced 5 minutes later with incremental doses of alfaxalone to achieve intubation and was maintained for 90 minutes in A with alfaxalone (0.12 mg kg–1 minute–1), in ALF with alfaxalone (0.09 mg kg–1 minute–1) and fentanyl (0.1 μg kg–1 minute–1) and in AHF with alfaxalone (0.06 mg kg–1 minute–1) and fentanyl (0.2 μg kg–1 minute–1). The alfaxalone infusion was increased or decreased by 0.006 mg kg–1 minute–1 based on positive or negative response to antebrachium stimulation (50 V, 50 Hz, 10 ms). Data were analyzed using a mixed-model ANOVA and presented as least squares means ± standard error. Results: Alfaxalone induction doses were 3.50 ± 0.13 (A), 2.17 ± 0.10 (ALF) and 1.67 ± 0.10 mg kg–1 (AHF) and differed among treatments (p < 0.05). Alfaxalone MIRNM was 0.17 ± 0.01 (A), 0.10 ± 0.01 (ALF) and 0.07 ± 0.01 mg kg–1 minute–1 (AHF) and differed among treatments. ALF and AHF decreased the MIRNM by 44 ± 8{\%} and 62 ± 5{\%}, respectively (p < 0.05). Plasma alfaxalone concentrations at MIRNM were 5.82 ± 0.48 (A), 4.40 ± 0.34 (ALF) and 2.28 ± 0.09 μg mL–1 (AHF). Conclusions and clinical relevance: Fentanyl, at the doses studied, significantly decreased the alfaxalone induction dose and MIRNM.",
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T1 - Effect of fentanyl on the induction dose and minimum infusion rate of alfaxalone preventing movement in dogs

AU - Bennett, Katherine J.

AU - Seddighi, Reza

AU - Moorhead, Kaitlin A.

AU - Messenger, Kristin

AU - Cox, Sherry K.

AU - Sun, Xiaocun

AU - Pasloske, Kirby

AU - Pypendop, Bruno H

AU - Doherty, Thomas J.

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Objective: To determine the effect of fentanyl on the induction dose and minimum infusion rate of alfaxalone required to prevent movement in response to a noxious stimulus (MIRNM) in dogs. Study design: Experimental crossover design. Animals: A group of six healthy, adult, intact female mixed-breed dogs, weighing 19.7 ± 1.3 kg. Methods: Dogs were randomly administered one of three treatments at weekly intervals: premedication with 0.9% saline (treatment A), fentanyl 5 μg kg–1 (treatment ALF) or fentanyl 10 μg kg–1 (treatment AHF), administered intravenously over 5 minutes. Anesthesia was induced 5 minutes later with incremental doses of alfaxalone to achieve intubation and was maintained for 90 minutes in A with alfaxalone (0.12 mg kg–1 minute–1), in ALF with alfaxalone (0.09 mg kg–1 minute–1) and fentanyl (0.1 μg kg–1 minute–1) and in AHF with alfaxalone (0.06 mg kg–1 minute–1) and fentanyl (0.2 μg kg–1 minute–1). The alfaxalone infusion was increased or decreased by 0.006 mg kg–1 minute–1 based on positive or negative response to antebrachium stimulation (50 V, 50 Hz, 10 ms). Data were analyzed using a mixed-model ANOVA and presented as least squares means ± standard error. Results: Alfaxalone induction doses were 3.50 ± 0.13 (A), 2.17 ± 0.10 (ALF) and 1.67 ± 0.10 mg kg–1 (AHF) and differed among treatments (p < 0.05). Alfaxalone MIRNM was 0.17 ± 0.01 (A), 0.10 ± 0.01 (ALF) and 0.07 ± 0.01 mg kg–1 minute–1 (AHF) and differed among treatments. ALF and AHF decreased the MIRNM by 44 ± 8% and 62 ± 5%, respectively (p < 0.05). Plasma alfaxalone concentrations at MIRNM were 5.82 ± 0.48 (A), 4.40 ± 0.34 (ALF) and 2.28 ± 0.09 μg mL–1 (AHF). Conclusions and clinical relevance: Fentanyl, at the doses studied, significantly decreased the alfaxalone induction dose and MIRNM.

AB - Objective: To determine the effect of fentanyl on the induction dose and minimum infusion rate of alfaxalone required to prevent movement in response to a noxious stimulus (MIRNM) in dogs. Study design: Experimental crossover design. Animals: A group of six healthy, adult, intact female mixed-breed dogs, weighing 19.7 ± 1.3 kg. Methods: Dogs were randomly administered one of three treatments at weekly intervals: premedication with 0.9% saline (treatment A), fentanyl 5 μg kg–1 (treatment ALF) or fentanyl 10 μg kg–1 (treatment AHF), administered intravenously over 5 minutes. Anesthesia was induced 5 minutes later with incremental doses of alfaxalone to achieve intubation and was maintained for 90 minutes in A with alfaxalone (0.12 mg kg–1 minute–1), in ALF with alfaxalone (0.09 mg kg–1 minute–1) and fentanyl (0.1 μg kg–1 minute–1) and in AHF with alfaxalone (0.06 mg kg–1 minute–1) and fentanyl (0.2 μg kg–1 minute–1). The alfaxalone infusion was increased or decreased by 0.006 mg kg–1 minute–1 based on positive or negative response to antebrachium stimulation (50 V, 50 Hz, 10 ms). Data were analyzed using a mixed-model ANOVA and presented as least squares means ± standard error. Results: Alfaxalone induction doses were 3.50 ± 0.13 (A), 2.17 ± 0.10 (ALF) and 1.67 ± 0.10 mg kg–1 (AHF) and differed among treatments (p < 0.05). Alfaxalone MIRNM was 0.17 ± 0.01 (A), 0.10 ± 0.01 (ALF) and 0.07 ± 0.01 mg kg–1 minute–1 (AHF) and differed among treatments. ALF and AHF decreased the MIRNM by 44 ± 8% and 62 ± 5%, respectively (p < 0.05). Plasma alfaxalone concentrations at MIRNM were 5.82 ± 0.48 (A), 4.40 ± 0.34 (ALF) and 2.28 ± 0.09 μg mL–1 (AHF). Conclusions and clinical relevance: Fentanyl, at the doses studied, significantly decreased the alfaxalone induction dose and MIRNM.

KW - alfaxalone

KW - anesthesia

KW - dogs

KW - fentanyl

KW - minimum infusion rate

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