Effect of different types of classical music played at a veterinary hospital on dog behavior and owner satisfaction

Whitney J. Engler, Melissa Bain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of different types of classical music played during a veterinary visit on dog behavior and owner satisfaction. DESIGN Prospective randomized controlled study. ANIMALS 74 dogs examined at a veterinary teaching hospital. PROCEDURES Dogs examined for a wellness visit, presurgical health evaluation, or nonurgent illness were exposed to 1 of 3 treatments (modified classical music, the same music in its original format, and no music [control]) while in the examination room. Owners completed a standardized survey regarding the dog’s behavior and their satisfaction with the visit. Clinicians completed a separate standardized survey regarding the dog’s behavior. Information regarding monetary charges, procedures performed, diagnoses, and physiologic variables was obtained from the electronic medical record after the appointment. RESULTS Owners rated their dog’s anxiety level in the waiting room greater than that in the examination room regardless of treatment. Mean anxiety and aggression scores of dogs during the physical examination as rated by owners were significantly greater than those assigned by clinicians. Visit satisfaction for owners exposed to original classical music was significantly greater than that for owners not exposed to music. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested placing a pet and its owner into an examination room instead of a waiting room immediately after clinic arrival may ameliorate pet anxiety during the veterinary visit. Playing classical music at a low volume can be a simple and cost-effective way to improve owner satisfaction with the veterinary visit. Further research is necessary to determine the effects of music on pet anxiety.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)195-200
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume251
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 15 2017

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Animal Hospitals
music
veterinary clinics
Music
Dogs
dogs
anxiety
Pets
Anxiety
pets
Electronic Health Records
Aggression
Teaching Hospitals
clinical examination
Physical Examination
electronics
aggression
Appointments and Schedules
Costs and Cost Analysis
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

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title = "Effect of different types of classical music played at a veterinary hospital on dog behavior and owner satisfaction",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of different types of classical music played during a veterinary visit on dog behavior and owner satisfaction. DESIGN Prospective randomized controlled study. ANIMALS 74 dogs examined at a veterinary teaching hospital. PROCEDURES Dogs examined for a wellness visit, presurgical health evaluation, or nonurgent illness were exposed to 1 of 3 treatments (modified classical music, the same music in its original format, and no music [control]) while in the examination room. Owners completed a standardized survey regarding the dog’s behavior and their satisfaction with the visit. Clinicians completed a separate standardized survey regarding the dog’s behavior. Information regarding monetary charges, procedures performed, diagnoses, and physiologic variables was obtained from the electronic medical record after the appointment. RESULTS Owners rated their dog’s anxiety level in the waiting room greater than that in the examination room regardless of treatment. Mean anxiety and aggression scores of dogs during the physical examination as rated by owners were significantly greater than those assigned by clinicians. Visit satisfaction for owners exposed to original classical music was significantly greater than that for owners not exposed to music. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested placing a pet and its owner into an examination room instead of a waiting room immediately after clinic arrival may ameliorate pet anxiety during the veterinary visit. Playing classical music at a low volume can be a simple and cost-effective way to improve owner satisfaction with the veterinary visit. Further research is necessary to determine the effects of music on pet anxiety.",
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