Effect of dietary protein and GABA on food intake, growth and tissue amino acids in cats

Jean K. Tews, Quinton Rogers, James Morris, Alfred E. Harper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

GABA at 5%, but not 3%, of a low protein diet depressed food intake and growth of kittens. Adaptation to high protein prevented these effects. When cats adapted to low or high protein were fed a meal containing GABA, plasma GABA concentration after 2 hr was 8-fold higher in the low than in the high protein group; clearance was almost complete within 6 hr. Concentrations of proline, branched-chain, other large neutral and basic (especially ornithine) amino acids increased more when cats were fed a high rather than a low protein meal; glycine decreased. At 6 hr, concentrations had consistently returned to initial levels only in the low protein group. Feeding the high protein diet ad lib increased tissue concentrations of threonine, proline and the branched-chain amino acids. Hepatic or renal GABA-aminotransferase activity was not altered in kittens fed the high protein diet. Kidney activity was 10-fold that of liver, which may contribute to the better tolerance of GABA by cats than by rats.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)301-308
Number of pages8
JournalPhysiology and Behavior
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1984

Fingerprint

Dietary Proteins
gamma-Aminobutyric Acid
Cats
Eating
Amino Acids
Growth
Proteins
Proline
Meals
4-Aminobutyrate Transaminase
Diet
Kidney
Branched Chain Amino Acids
Protein-Restricted Diet
Ornithine
Liver
Threonine
Glycine

Keywords

  • Cats
  • Dietary GABA
  • Dietary protein
  • Food intake
  • GABA-aminotransferase
  • Growth
  • Tissue amino acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Effect of dietary protein and GABA on food intake, growth and tissue amino acids in cats. / Tews, Jean K.; Rogers, Quinton; Morris, James; Harper, Alfred E.

In: Physiology and Behavior, Vol. 32, No. 2, 01.01.1984, p. 301-308.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{354868155b2b46d28925225dfbae656d,
title = "Effect of dietary protein and GABA on food intake, growth and tissue amino acids in cats",
abstract = "GABA at 5{\%}, but not 3{\%}, of a low protein diet depressed food intake and growth of kittens. Adaptation to high protein prevented these effects. When cats adapted to low or high protein were fed a meal containing GABA, plasma GABA concentration after 2 hr was 8-fold higher in the low than in the high protein group; clearance was almost complete within 6 hr. Concentrations of proline, branched-chain, other large neutral and basic (especially ornithine) amino acids increased more when cats were fed a high rather than a low protein meal; glycine decreased. At 6 hr, concentrations had consistently returned to initial levels only in the low protein group. Feeding the high protein diet ad lib increased tissue concentrations of threonine, proline and the branched-chain amino acids. Hepatic or renal GABA-aminotransferase activity was not altered in kittens fed the high protein diet. Kidney activity was 10-fold that of liver, which may contribute to the better tolerance of GABA by cats than by rats.",
keywords = "Cats, Dietary GABA, Dietary protein, Food intake, GABA-aminotransferase, Growth, Tissue amino acids",
author = "Tews, {Jean K.} and Quinton Rogers and James Morris and Harper, {Alfred E.}",
year = "1984",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/0031-9384(84)90145-8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "32",
pages = "301--308",
journal = "Physiology and Behavior",
issn = "0031-9384",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of dietary protein and GABA on food intake, growth and tissue amino acids in cats

AU - Tews, Jean K.

AU - Rogers, Quinton

AU - Morris, James

AU - Harper, Alfred E.

PY - 1984/1/1

Y1 - 1984/1/1

N2 - GABA at 5%, but not 3%, of a low protein diet depressed food intake and growth of kittens. Adaptation to high protein prevented these effects. When cats adapted to low or high protein were fed a meal containing GABA, plasma GABA concentration after 2 hr was 8-fold higher in the low than in the high protein group; clearance was almost complete within 6 hr. Concentrations of proline, branched-chain, other large neutral and basic (especially ornithine) amino acids increased more when cats were fed a high rather than a low protein meal; glycine decreased. At 6 hr, concentrations had consistently returned to initial levels only in the low protein group. Feeding the high protein diet ad lib increased tissue concentrations of threonine, proline and the branched-chain amino acids. Hepatic or renal GABA-aminotransferase activity was not altered in kittens fed the high protein diet. Kidney activity was 10-fold that of liver, which may contribute to the better tolerance of GABA by cats than by rats.

AB - GABA at 5%, but not 3%, of a low protein diet depressed food intake and growth of kittens. Adaptation to high protein prevented these effects. When cats adapted to low or high protein were fed a meal containing GABA, plasma GABA concentration after 2 hr was 8-fold higher in the low than in the high protein group; clearance was almost complete within 6 hr. Concentrations of proline, branched-chain, other large neutral and basic (especially ornithine) amino acids increased more when cats were fed a high rather than a low protein meal; glycine decreased. At 6 hr, concentrations had consistently returned to initial levels only in the low protein group. Feeding the high protein diet ad lib increased tissue concentrations of threonine, proline and the branched-chain amino acids. Hepatic or renal GABA-aminotransferase activity was not altered in kittens fed the high protein diet. Kidney activity was 10-fold that of liver, which may contribute to the better tolerance of GABA by cats than by rats.

KW - Cats

KW - Dietary GABA

KW - Dietary protein

KW - Food intake

KW - GABA-aminotransferase

KW - Growth

KW - Tissue amino acids

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0021253897&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0021253897&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0031-9384(84)90145-8

DO - 10.1016/0031-9384(84)90145-8

M3 - Article

VL - 32

SP - 301

EP - 308

JO - Physiology and Behavior

JF - Physiology and Behavior

SN - 0031-9384

IS - 2

ER -