Effect of dietary phosphoric acid supplementation on acid-base balance and mineral and bone metabolism in adult cats.

M. J. Fettman, J. M. Coble, D. W. Hamar, R. W. Norrdin, H. B. Seim, R. D. Kealy, Quinton Rogers, K. McCrea, K. Moffat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Experimental evidence indicates that maintenance of urinary pH < or = 6.4 is the single most effective means of preventing feline struvite crystalluria or urolithiasis of noninfectious causes. This may be accomplished by dietary acidification, but must be moderated to avoid potential adverse effects of excessive acidification, including bone demineralization, negative calcium balance, potassium depletion, and renal disease. Effects of chronic dietary phosphoric acid supplementation on acid-base balance and on mineral and bone metabolism were investigated in adult, domestic cats. One group of 6 cats was fed a basal, naturally acidifying diet without added acidifiers, and another group of 6 cats was fed 1.7% dietary phosphoric acid. Changes observed during 12 months of study included development of noncompensated metabolic acidosis, increased urinary calcium excretion, and lower but positive calcium balance in cats of both groups. Urinary pH decreased in cats of both groups, but was significantly (P < 0.05) and consistently maintained < or = 6.4 in cats given dietary phosphoric acid. Urinary phosphorus excretion increased in cats of both groups, but was significantly (P < 0.05) greater in phosphoric acid-supplemented cats, leading to lower overall phosphorus balance as well. Potassium balance decreased in cats of both groups, but was only transiently negative in the phosphoric acid-supplemented cats midway through the study, and normalized at positive values thereafter. Plasma taurine concentration was not affected by dietary acidification, and remained well within the acceptable reference range for taurine metabolism. Double labeling of bone in vivo with fluorescent markers was followed by bone biopsy and histomorphometric measurement of several static and dynamic variables of bone formation. Overall indices of bone formation decreased in cats of both groups with age and confinement, but were not affected by dietary phosphoric acid supplementation. Dietary supplementation with phosphoric acid used as the principal inorganic P source to achieve moderate and stable degree of urinary acidification, did not appear over the course of 1 year, to have induced adverse effects on mineral, bone, or taurine balance in these adult domestic cats.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2125-2135
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume53
Issue number11
StatePublished - Nov 1 1992
Externally publishedYes

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mineral metabolism
bone metabolism
acid-base balance
phosphoric acid
Acid-Base Equilibrium
Minerals
Cats
cats
Bone and Bones
Taurine
acidification
taurine
bones
Calcium
Osteogenesis
bone formation
Phosphorus
calcium
Potassium
excretion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Fettman, M. J., Coble, J. M., Hamar, D. W., Norrdin, R. W., Seim, H. B., Kealy, R. D., ... Moffat, K. (1992). Effect of dietary phosphoric acid supplementation on acid-base balance and mineral and bone metabolism in adult cats. American Journal of Veterinary Research, 53(11), 2125-2135.

Effect of dietary phosphoric acid supplementation on acid-base balance and mineral and bone metabolism in adult cats. / Fettman, M. J.; Coble, J. M.; Hamar, D. W.; Norrdin, R. W.; Seim, H. B.; Kealy, R. D.; Rogers, Quinton; McCrea, K.; Moffat, K.

In: American Journal of Veterinary Research, Vol. 53, No. 11, 01.11.1992, p. 2125-2135.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fettman, MJ, Coble, JM, Hamar, DW, Norrdin, RW, Seim, HB, Kealy, RD, Rogers, Q, McCrea, K & Moffat, K 1992, 'Effect of dietary phosphoric acid supplementation on acid-base balance and mineral and bone metabolism in adult cats.', American Journal of Veterinary Research, vol. 53, no. 11, pp. 2125-2135.
Fettman, M. J. ; Coble, J. M. ; Hamar, D. W. ; Norrdin, R. W. ; Seim, H. B. ; Kealy, R. D. ; Rogers, Quinton ; McCrea, K. ; Moffat, K. / Effect of dietary phosphoric acid supplementation on acid-base balance and mineral and bone metabolism in adult cats. In: American Journal of Veterinary Research. 1992 ; Vol. 53, No. 11. pp. 2125-2135.
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abstract = "Experimental evidence indicates that maintenance of urinary pH < or = 6.4 is the single most effective means of preventing feline struvite crystalluria or urolithiasis of noninfectious causes. This may be accomplished by dietary acidification, but must be moderated to avoid potential adverse effects of excessive acidification, including bone demineralization, negative calcium balance, potassium depletion, and renal disease. Effects of chronic dietary phosphoric acid supplementation on acid-base balance and on mineral and bone metabolism were investigated in adult, domestic cats. One group of 6 cats was fed a basal, naturally acidifying diet without added acidifiers, and another group of 6 cats was fed 1.7{\%} dietary phosphoric acid. Changes observed during 12 months of study included development of noncompensated metabolic acidosis, increased urinary calcium excretion, and lower but positive calcium balance in cats of both groups. Urinary pH decreased in cats of both groups, but was significantly (P < 0.05) and consistently maintained < or = 6.4 in cats given dietary phosphoric acid. Urinary phosphorus excretion increased in cats of both groups, but was significantly (P < 0.05) greater in phosphoric acid-supplemented cats, leading to lower overall phosphorus balance as well. Potassium balance decreased in cats of both groups, but was only transiently negative in the phosphoric acid-supplemented cats midway through the study, and normalized at positive values thereafter. Plasma taurine concentration was not affected by dietary acidification, and remained well within the acceptable reference range for taurine metabolism. Double labeling of bone in vivo with fluorescent markers was followed by bone biopsy and histomorphometric measurement of several static and dynamic variables of bone formation. Overall indices of bone formation decreased in cats of both groups with age and confinement, but were not affected by dietary phosphoric acid supplementation. Dietary supplementation with phosphoric acid used as the principal inorganic P source to achieve moderate and stable degree of urinary acidification, did not appear over the course of 1 year, to have induced adverse effects on mineral, bone, or taurine balance in these adult domestic cats.",
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AU - Seim, H. B.

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