Effect of body direction on heart rate in trailered horses.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To determine whether body direction in a trailer affects the degree to which a horse is excited (and presumably stressed) during transport, heart rates were measured in 8 Thoroughbred geldings transported over a 32-km route of county roads while tethered facing forward or backward in a 4-horse stock trailer. Heart rates also were measured on the horses while they were tethered facing forward or backward in the same trailer while it was parked. Heart rates decreased during the first 10 minutes for both groups, and remained stable after the first 15 minutes. Heart rates were not significantly different between horses facing forward or backward during transport or while parked. Heart rates were significantly (P < 0.05) higher for horses during transport, compared with those of horses in a parked trailer whether facing forward or backward.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1007-1011
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume55
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 1994

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Horses
heart rate
trailers
Heart Rate
horses
geldings
Direction compound
roads

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Effect of body direction on heart rate in trailered horses. / Smith, B. L.; Jones, James H; Carlson, Gary; Pascoe, John.

In: American Journal of Veterinary Research, Vol. 55, No. 7, 07.1994, p. 1007-1011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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