Educational status and health.

Peter Franks, V. Boisseau

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Some of the problems with the traditional measures of socioeconomic status include (1) the loss of information resulting from combining different factors that have varying associations with health problems; (2) the reverse causal pathway that exists from health and illness to income and occupation; and (3) a number of particular problems with deriving socioeconomic status from census tract information. In contrast there are clear advantages to using educational status as the primary socioeconomic index. A wide variety of literature is reviewed pointing to a strong positive relationship between years of schooling and health. Three models that attempt to account for this association are described. It is suggested that the educational status of patients should be part of their data base.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1029-1034
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Family Practice
Volume10
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1980
Externally publishedYes

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Educational Status
Social Class
Health
Censuses
Occupations
Databases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Franks, P., & Boisseau, V. (1980). Educational status and health. Journal of Family Practice, 10(6), 1029-1034.

Educational status and health. / Franks, Peter; Boisseau, V.

In: Journal of Family Practice, Vol. 10, No. 6, 06.1980, p. 1029-1034.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Franks, P & Boisseau, V 1980, 'Educational status and health.', Journal of Family Practice, vol. 10, no. 6, pp. 1029-1034.
Franks, Peter ; Boisseau, V. / Educational status and health. In: Journal of Family Practice. 1980 ; Vol. 10, No. 6. pp. 1029-1034.
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