Economics of feeding pasteurized colostrum and pasteurized waste milk to dairy calves

Aziz A. Jamaluddin, Tim Carpenter, David W. Hird, Mark Thurmond

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To estimate the marginal contribution of pasteurization of waste milk and colostrum to gross margin per calf at weaning and to estimate the minimum number of cattle on a dairy farm for pasteurization to be profitable. Design - Randomized, controlled, clinical trial. Animals - 300 Holstein calves. Procedure - The performance of calves fed pasteurized colostrum and waste milk was compared with the performance of calves fed nonpasteurized colostrum and waste milk. Costs, revenues, and gross margins for the 2 groups were compared. Results - Calves fed pasteurized colostrum and waste milk were worth an extra $8.13 in gross margin/ calf, compared with calves fed nonpasteurized colostrum and waste milk. The minimum number of cattle for which feeding pasteurized colostrum and waste milk was calculated to be economically feasible was 315 calves/d (1,260-cow dairy farm). Clinical Implications - An economic benefit was associated with feeding pasteurized colostrum and waste milk. Additional benefits that may accrue include higher mean weight gain and lower mortality rate of calves as well as calves that have fewer days in which they are affected with diarrhea and pneumonia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)751-756
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume209
Issue number4
StatePublished - Aug 15 1996

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Colostrum
dairy calves
colostrum
Milk
Economics
calves
milk
economics
Pasteurization
pasteurization
dairy farming
Weaning
cattle feeding
Weight Gain
Diarrhea
Pneumonia
randomized clinical trials
Randomized Controlled Trials
Costs and Cost Analysis
pneumonia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Economics of feeding pasteurized colostrum and pasteurized waste milk to dairy calves. / Jamaluddin, Aziz A.; Carpenter, Tim; Hird, David W.; Thurmond, Mark.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 209, No. 4, 15.08.1996, p. 751-756.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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