Economics of Brucella ovis control in sheep: epidemiologic simulation model.

Tim Carpenter, S. L. Berry, J. S. Glenn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The epidemiology and economics of Brucella ovis control in a hypothetical, commercial sheep flock (100 rams and 2,500 ewes) were investigated. The investigation consisted of an epidemiologic simulation model, reported here, and a decision-tree analysis, reported in a companion paper. The epidemiologic model was designed to simulate the transmission and persistence of B ovis in a ram flock during the mating season as well as the nonmating (isolation) season. A constant contact rate was selected for the nonmating season and a varying contact rate was selected for the mating season to reflect changes in numbers of ewes in estrus. These contact rates were used to evaluate all possible combinations of 5 control alternatives for flock infection rates ranging from 0% to 38%. Vaccination was found to be more effective as a control strategy when the prevalence of flock infection was high (greater than 15%); however, it did not substantially reduce B ovis transmission when the prevalence of flock infection was low (less than 10%). The effect of increasing vaccine efficacy from 40% to 80% had minimal effect on incidence of new cases. The speed with which B ovis could be eradicated depended on the initial prevalence of infection and the screening tests used (palpation, semen testing for leukocytes, and ELISA). All combinations of screening tests verified the usefulness of palpation. Simulation model results indicated that it may be feasible to eradicate B ovis from flocks with moderate to high (10% to 38%) prevalence of infection by culling on the basis of 2 sequential tests.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)977-982
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume190
Issue number8
StatePublished - Apr 15 1987
Externally publishedYes

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Brucella ovis
Brucella melitensis biovar Ovis
simulation models
Sheep
Ovis
flocks
Economics
sheep
economics
Infection
Palpation
infection
rams
ewes
breeding season
Decision Trees
Decision Support Techniques
screening
Estrus
culling (animals)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Economics of Brucella ovis control in sheep : epidemiologic simulation model. / Carpenter, Tim; Berry, S. L.; Glenn, J. S.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 190, No. 8, 15.04.1987, p. 977-982.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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