Early events in naphthalene-induced acute Clara cell toxicity II. Comparison of glutathione depletion and histopathology by airway location

Charles Plopper, L. S. Van Winkle, M. V. Fanucchi, S. R C Malburg, S. J. Nishio, A. Chang, Alan R Buckpitt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

One of the presumed roles of intracellular glutathione (GSH) is the protection of cells from injury by reactive intermediates produced by the metabolism of xenobiotics. To establish whether GSH depletion is a critical step in the initiation of events that lead to cytotoxicity by P450-activated cytotoxicants, naphthalene, a well-defined Clara cell cytotoxicant, was administered to mice (200 mg/kg) by intraperitoneal injection. Shortly after injection (1, 2, and 3 h), intracellular GSH content was assessed by high performance liquid chromatography or quantitative epifluorescent imaging microscopy and compared with the degree of cytotoxicity as assessed by high resolution histopathology. In highly susceptible airways (distal bronchioles), GSH decreased by 50% in 1 h. Cytoplasmic vacuolization was not visible until 2 h, when GSH had decreased by an additional 50%. By 3 h, cytoplasmic blebbing was extensive. In minimally susceptible airways (lobar and proximal bronchi), GSH depletion varied widely within the population; a small proportion of the cells lost greater than 50% of their GSH by 2 h and a significant percentage of the cells retained most of their GSH throughout the entire 3 h. Cytoplasmic vacuolization was apparent in some of the cells at 2 h but not visible in any cells at 3 h. We conclude that (1) loss of intracellular GSH is an early event that precedes initial signs of cellular damage in Clara cell cytotoxicity; (2) this pattern of loss in relation to early injury is found both in highly susceptible and minimally susceptible airway sites; (3) there is wide cell-to-cell heterogeneity in the response; (4) the heterogeneity in the response profile varies between populations in highly susceptible and minimally susceptible sites; and (5) once the intracellular GSH concentration within the entire cell population drops below a certain threshold, the initial phase of injury becomes irreversible.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)272-281
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology
Volume24
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2001

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Cytotoxicity
Glutathione
Toxicity
High performance liquid chromatography
Xenobiotics
Metabolism
Microscopic examination
Cells
Imaging techniques
Wounds and Injuries
Population
Bronchioles
naphthalene
Cytoprotection
Bronchi
Blister
Intraperitoneal Injections
Microscopy
High Pressure Liquid Chromatography
Injections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Early events in naphthalene-induced acute Clara cell toxicity II. Comparison of glutathione depletion and histopathology by airway location. / Plopper, Charles; Van Winkle, L. S.; Fanucchi, M. V.; Malburg, S. R C; Nishio, S. J.; Chang, A.; Buckpitt, Alan R.

In: American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology, Vol. 24, No. 3, 2001, p. 272-281.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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