Early developments in gene-expression profiling of breast tumors: Potential for increasing black-white patient disparities in breast cancer outcomes?

Donna H. Odierna, Aimee Afable-Munsuz, Ogechi Ikediobi, Mary Beattie, Sara Knight, Michelle J Ko, Adrienne Wilson, Ninez A. Ponce

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

New prognostic tests, such as gene-expression profiling (GEP) of breast tumors, are expected to prolong survival and improve the quality of life for many breast cancer patients. In this article, we argue that GEP has not been adequately validated in minority populations, and that both biological and social factors might affect the broad utility of these tests in diverse populations. We suggest that the widespread use of this technology could potentially lead to suboptimal treatment for black women, resulting in a further increase in black-white patient disparities in treatment response, morbidity and mortality rates. We argue for the need to build a large and diverse evidence base for GEP and other emerging technologies in personalized medicine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)669-679
Number of pages11
JournalPersonalized Medicine
Volume8
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • African-American women
  • breast cancer mortality
  • gene-expression profiling
  • personalized medicine
  • racial disparities
  • social determinants of health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmacology
  • Medicine(all)

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