Early detection and treatment of skin cancer

Anthony F Jerant, Jennifer T. Johnson, Catherine Demastes Sheridan, Timothy J. Caffrey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

223 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The incidence of skin cancer is increasing by epidemic proportions. Basal cell cancer remains the most common skin neoplasm, and simple excision is generally curative. Squamous cell cancers may be preceded by actinic keratoses-premalignant lesions that are treated with cryotherapy, excision, curettage or topical 5-fluorouracil. While squamous cell carcinoma is usually easily cured with local excision, it may invade deeper structures and metastasize. Aggressive local growth and metastasis are common features of malignant melanoma, which accounts for 75 percent of all deaths associated with skin cancer. Early detection greatly improves the prognosis of patients with malignant melanoma. The differential diagnosis of pigmented lesions is challenging, although the ABCD and seven-point checklists are helpful in determining which pigmented lesions require excision. Sun exposure remains the most important risk factor for all skin neoplasms. Thus, patients should be taught basic 'safe sun' measures: sun avoidance during peak ultraviolet-B hours; proper use of sunscreen and protective clothing; and avoidance of suntanning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Family Physician
Volume62
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jul 15 2000

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Skin Neoplasms
Solar System
Melanoma
Basal Cell Neoplasms
Sunbathing
Protective Clothing
Actinic Keratosis
Sunscreening Agents
Squamous Cell Neoplasms
Cryotherapy
Curettage
Therapeutics
Checklist
Fluorouracil
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Differential Diagnosis
Neoplasm Metastasis
Incidence
Growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Jerant, A. F., Johnson, J. T., Sheridan, C. D., & Caffrey, T. J. (2000). Early detection and treatment of skin cancer. American Family Physician, 62(2).

Early detection and treatment of skin cancer. / Jerant, Anthony F; Johnson, Jennifer T.; Sheridan, Catherine Demastes; Caffrey, Timothy J.

In: American Family Physician, Vol. 62, No. 2, 15.07.2000.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jerant, AF, Johnson, JT, Sheridan, CD & Caffrey, TJ 2000, 'Early detection and treatment of skin cancer', American Family Physician, vol. 62, no. 2.
Jerant AF, Johnson JT, Sheridan CD, Caffrey TJ. Early detection and treatment of skin cancer. American Family Physician. 2000 Jul 15;62(2).
Jerant, Anthony F ; Johnson, Jennifer T. ; Sheridan, Catherine Demastes ; Caffrey, Timothy J. / Early detection and treatment of skin cancer. In: American Family Physician. 2000 ; Vol. 62, No. 2.
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