Early childhood lower respiratory illness and air pollution

Irva Hertz-Picciotto, Rebecca James Baker, Poh Sin Yap, Miroslav Dostál, Jesse P. Joad, Michael Lipsett, Teri Greenfield, Caroline E W Herr, Ivan Beneš, Robert H. Shumway, Kent E Pinkerton, Radim Šrám

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

92 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Few studies of air pollutants address morbidity in preschool children. In this study we evaluated bronchitis in children from two Czech districts: Teplice, with high ambient air pollution, and Prachatice, characterized by lower exposures. Objectives: Our goal was to examine rates of lower respiratory illnesses in preschool children in relation to ambient particles and hydrocarbons. Methods: Air monitoring for particulate matter < 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was conducted daily, every third day, or every sixth day. Children born May 1994 through December 1998 were followed to 3 or 4.5 years of age to ascertain illness diagnoses. Mothers completed questionnaires at birth and at follow-up regarding demographic, lifestyle; reproductive, and home environmental factors. Longitudinal multivariate repeated measures analysis was used to quantify rate ratios for bronchitis and for total lower respiratory illnesses in 1,133 children. Results: After adjustment for season, temperature, and other covariates, bronchitis rates increased with rising pollutant concentrations. Below 2 years of age, increments in 30-day averages of 100 ng/m3 PAHs and 25 μg/m3 PM2.5 resulted in rate ratios (RRs) for bronchitis of 1.29 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.07-1.54] and 1.30 (95% CI, 1.08-1.58), respectively; from 2 to 4.5 years of age, these RRs were 1.56 (95% CI, 1.22-2.00) and 1.23 (95% CI, 0.94-1.62), respectively. Conclusion: Ambient PAHs and fine particles were associated with early-life susceptibility to bronchitis. Associations were stronger for longer pollutant-averaging periods and, among children > 2 years of age, for PAHs compared with fine particles. Preschool-age children may be particularly vulnerable to air pollution-induced illnesses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1510-1518
Number of pages9
JournalEnvironmental Health Perspectives
Volume115
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2007

Fingerprint

Air Pollution
Preschool Children
Air pollution
atmospheric pollution
Air Pollutants
Particulate Matter
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons
Hydrocarbons
Bronchitis
Respiratory Rate
Monitoring
morbidity
Air
ambient air
Morbidity
particulate matter
PAH
hydrocarbon
air
monitoring

Keywords

  • Air pollution
  • Bronchitis
  • Children's health
  • Infant
  • PAHs
  • Particulate matter
  • PM
  • Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons
  • Respiratory illness
  • Volatile organic compounds

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Hertz-Picciotto, I., Baker, R. J., Yap, P. S., Dostál, M., Joad, J. P., Lipsett, M., ... Šrám, R. (2007). Early childhood lower respiratory illness and air pollution. Environmental Health Perspectives, 115(10), 1510-1518. https://doi.org/10.1289/ehp.9617

Early childhood lower respiratory illness and air pollution. / Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Baker, Rebecca James; Yap, Poh Sin; Dostál, Miroslav; Joad, Jesse P.; Lipsett, Michael; Greenfield, Teri; Herr, Caroline E W; Beneš, Ivan; Shumway, Robert H.; Pinkerton, Kent E; Šrám, Radim.

In: Environmental Health Perspectives, Vol. 115, No. 10, 10.2007, p. 1510-1518.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hertz-Picciotto, I, Baker, RJ, Yap, PS, Dostál, M, Joad, JP, Lipsett, M, Greenfield, T, Herr, CEW, Beneš, I, Shumway, RH, Pinkerton, KE & Šrám, R 2007, 'Early childhood lower respiratory illness and air pollution', Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 115, no. 10, pp. 1510-1518. https://doi.org/10.1289/ehp.9617
Hertz-Picciotto, Irva ; Baker, Rebecca James ; Yap, Poh Sin ; Dostál, Miroslav ; Joad, Jesse P. ; Lipsett, Michael ; Greenfield, Teri ; Herr, Caroline E W ; Beneš, Ivan ; Shumway, Robert H. ; Pinkerton, Kent E ; Šrám, Radim. / Early childhood lower respiratory illness and air pollution. In: Environmental Health Perspectives. 2007 ; Vol. 115, No. 10. pp. 1510-1518.
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AU - Greenfield, Teri

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