E-care for heart wellness: A feasibility trial to decrease blood pressure and cardiovascular risk

Beverly B. Green, Melissa L. Anderson, Andrea J. Cook, Sheryl L Catz, Paul A. Fishman, Jennifer B. McClure, Robert J. Reid

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Pharmacist- or nurse-led team care decreases patient blood pressure (BP) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Purpose To evaluate whether a Web-based dietitian-led (WD) team care intervention was feasible and resulted in decreased BP, CVD risk, and weight compared to usual care (UC). Methods Electronic health record (EHR) data identified patients aged 30-69 years with BMI >26, elevated BP, and 10%-25% 10-year Framingham CVD risk who were registered patient website users. Patients with uncontrolled BP at screening were randomized to UC or WD, which included a home BP monitor, scale, and dietitian team care. WD participants had a single in-person dietitian visit to obtain baseline information and create a plan to reduce CVD risk. Planned follow-up occurred via secure messaging to report BP, weight, and fruit and vegetable intake and receive ongoing feedback. If needed, dietitians encouraged patients and their physicians to intensify antihypertensive and lipid-lowering medications. Primary outcomes were change in systolic BP and weight loss ≥4 kg at 6 months. Feasibility outcomes included intervention utilization and satisfaction. Results Between 2010 and 2011, a total of 90 of 101 participants completed 6-month follow-ups. The WD group had higher rates of secure messaging utilization and patient satisfaction. The WD group lost significantly more weight than the UC group (adjusted net difference=-3.2 kg, 95% CI=-5.0, -1.5, p<0.001) and was more likely to lose ≥4 kg (adjusted relative risk [RRadj]=2.96, 95% CI=1.16, 7.53). BP control and CVD risk reduction were greater in WD than UC, but differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions WD intervention was feasible and resulted in decreased weight, BP, and CVD risk. A larger trial is justified. Trial Registration Number Trial Registration Number: NCT01077388.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)368-377
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume46
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Nutritionists
Blood Pressure
Cardiovascular Diseases
Weights and Measures
Hematologic Diseases
Blood Pressure Monitors
Patient Care Team
Electronic Health Records
Risk Reduction Behavior
Patient Satisfaction
Pharmacists
Vegetables
Antihypertensive Agents
Weight Loss
Fruit
Nurses
Physicians
Lipids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

E-care for heart wellness : A feasibility trial to decrease blood pressure and cardiovascular risk. / Green, Beverly B.; Anderson, Melissa L.; Cook, Andrea J.; Catz, Sheryl L; Fishman, Paul A.; McClure, Jennifer B.; Reid, Robert J.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 46, No. 4, 2014, p. 368-377.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Green, Beverly B. ; Anderson, Melissa L. ; Cook, Andrea J. ; Catz, Sheryl L ; Fishman, Paul A. ; McClure, Jennifer B. ; Reid, Robert J. / E-care for heart wellness : A feasibility trial to decrease blood pressure and cardiovascular risk. In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2014 ; Vol. 46, No. 4. pp. 368-377.
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abstract = "Background Pharmacist- or nurse-led team care decreases patient blood pressure (BP) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Purpose To evaluate whether a Web-based dietitian-led (WD) team care intervention was feasible and resulted in decreased BP, CVD risk, and weight compared to usual care (UC). Methods Electronic health record (EHR) data identified patients aged 30-69 years with BMI >26, elevated BP, and 10{\%}-25{\%} 10-year Framingham CVD risk who were registered patient website users. Patients with uncontrolled BP at screening were randomized to UC or WD, which included a home BP monitor, scale, and dietitian team care. WD participants had a single in-person dietitian visit to obtain baseline information and create a plan to reduce CVD risk. Planned follow-up occurred via secure messaging to report BP, weight, and fruit and vegetable intake and receive ongoing feedback. If needed, dietitians encouraged patients and their physicians to intensify antihypertensive and lipid-lowering medications. Primary outcomes were change in systolic BP and weight loss ≥4 kg at 6 months. Feasibility outcomes included intervention utilization and satisfaction. Results Between 2010 and 2011, a total of 90 of 101 participants completed 6-month follow-ups. The WD group had higher rates of secure messaging utilization and patient satisfaction. The WD group lost significantly more weight than the UC group (adjusted net difference=-3.2 kg, 95{\%} CI=-5.0, -1.5, p<0.001) and was more likely to lose ≥4 kg (adjusted relative risk [RRadj]=2.96, 95{\%} CI=1.16, 7.53). BP control and CVD risk reduction were greater in WD than UC, but differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions WD intervention was feasible and resulted in decreased weight, BP, and CVD risk. A larger trial is justified. Trial Registration Number Trial Registration Number: NCT01077388.",
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