Dystrophin-deficient cardiomyocytes derived from human urine: New biologic reagents for drug discovery

Xuan Guan, David L. Mack, Claudia M. Moreno, Jennifer L. Strande, Julie Mathieu, Yingai Shi, Chad D. Markert, Zejing Wang, Guihua Liu, Michael W. Lawlor, Emily C. Moorefield, Tara N. Jones, James A. Fugate, Mark E. Furth, Charles E. Murry, Hannele Ruohola-Baker, Yuanyuan Zhang, Luis Fernando Santana, Martin K. Childers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The ability to extract somatic cells from a patient and reprogram them to pluripotency opens up new possibilities for personalized medicine. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been employed to generate beating cardiomyocytes from a patient's skin or blood cells. Here, iPSC methods were used to generate cardiomyocytes starting from the urine of a patient with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Urine was chosen as a starting material because it contains adult stem cells called urine-derived stem cells (USCs). USCs express the canonical reprogramming factors c-myc and klf4, and possess high telomerase activity. Pluripotency of urine-derived iPSC clones was confirmed by immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR and teratoma formation. Urine-derived iPSC clones generated from healthy volunteers and a DMD patient were differentiated into beating cardiomyocytes using a series of small molecules in monolayer culture. Results indicate that cardiomyocytes retain the DMD patient's dystrophin mutation. Physiological assays suggest that dystrophin-deficient cardiomyocytes possess phenotypic differences from normal cardiomyocytes. These results demonstrate the feasibility of generating cardiomyocytes from a urine sample and that urine-derived cardiomyocytes retain characteristic features that might be further exploited for mechanistic studies and drug discovery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)467-480
Number of pages14
JournalStem Cell Research
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Dystrophin
Drug Discovery
Cardiac Myocytes
Urine
Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells
Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy
Stem Cells
Clone Cells
Precision Medicine
Adult Stem Cells
Telomerase
Teratoma
Cell Extracts
Blood Cells
Healthy Volunteers
Immunohistochemistry
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Skin
Mutation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Developmental Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Guan, X., Mack, D. L., Moreno, C. M., Strande, J. L., Mathieu, J., Shi, Y., ... Childers, M. K. (2014). Dystrophin-deficient cardiomyocytes derived from human urine: New biologic reagents for drug discovery. Stem Cell Research, 12(2), 467-480. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scr.2013.12.004

Dystrophin-deficient cardiomyocytes derived from human urine : New biologic reagents for drug discovery. / Guan, Xuan; Mack, David L.; Moreno, Claudia M.; Strande, Jennifer L.; Mathieu, Julie; Shi, Yingai; Markert, Chad D.; Wang, Zejing; Liu, Guihua; Lawlor, Michael W.; Moorefield, Emily C.; Jones, Tara N.; Fugate, James A.; Furth, Mark E.; Murry, Charles E.; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Santana, Luis Fernando; Childers, Martin K.

In: Stem Cell Research, Vol. 12, No. 2, 03.2014, p. 467-480.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Guan, X, Mack, DL, Moreno, CM, Strande, JL, Mathieu, J, Shi, Y, Markert, CD, Wang, Z, Liu, G, Lawlor, MW, Moorefield, EC, Jones, TN, Fugate, JA, Furth, ME, Murry, CE, Ruohola-Baker, H, Zhang, Y, Santana, LF & Childers, MK 2014, 'Dystrophin-deficient cardiomyocytes derived from human urine: New biologic reagents for drug discovery', Stem Cell Research, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 467-480. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scr.2013.12.004
Guan, Xuan ; Mack, David L. ; Moreno, Claudia M. ; Strande, Jennifer L. ; Mathieu, Julie ; Shi, Yingai ; Markert, Chad D. ; Wang, Zejing ; Liu, Guihua ; Lawlor, Michael W. ; Moorefield, Emily C. ; Jones, Tara N. ; Fugate, James A. ; Furth, Mark E. ; Murry, Charles E. ; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele ; Zhang, Yuanyuan ; Santana, Luis Fernando ; Childers, Martin K. / Dystrophin-deficient cardiomyocytes derived from human urine : New biologic reagents for drug discovery. In: Stem Cell Research. 2014 ; Vol. 12, No. 2. pp. 467-480.
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