Drosophila pro-apoptotic Bcl-2/Bax homologue reveals evolutionary conservation of cell death mechanisms

Hong Zhang, Qihong Huang, Ning Ke, Shigemi Matsuyama, Bruce Hammock, Adam Godzik, John C. Reed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

84 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Genetic analysis of programmed cell death in Drosophila reveals many similarities with mammals. Heretofore, a missing link in the fly has been the absence of any Bcl-2/Bax family members, proteins that function in mammals as regulators of mitochondrial cytochrome c release. A Drosophila homologue of the human killer protein Bok (DBok) was identified. The predicted structure of DBok is similar to pore-forming Bcl-2/Bax family members. DBok induces apoptosis in insect and human cells, which is suppressible by anti-apoptotic human Bcl-2 family proteins. A caspase inhibitor suppressed DBok-induced apoptosis but did not prevent DBok-induced cell death. Moreover, DBok targets mitochondria and triggers cytochrome c release through a caspase-independent mechanism. These characteristics of DBok reveal evolutionary conservation of cell death mechanisms in flies and humans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)27303-27306
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume275
Issue number35
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2000

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Cell death
Drosophila
Conservation
Mammals
Cell Death
Cytochromes c
Diptera
Apoptosis
Proteins
Mitochondria
Caspase Inhibitors
Caspases
Cells
Insects

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Zhang, H., Huang, Q., Ke, N., Matsuyama, S., Hammock, B., Godzik, A., & Reed, J. C. (2000). Drosophila pro-apoptotic Bcl-2/Bax homologue reveals evolutionary conservation of cell death mechanisms. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 275(35), 27303-27306. https://doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M002846200

Drosophila pro-apoptotic Bcl-2/Bax homologue reveals evolutionary conservation of cell death mechanisms. / Zhang, Hong; Huang, Qihong; Ke, Ning; Matsuyama, Shigemi; Hammock, Bruce; Godzik, Adam; Reed, John C.

In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 275, No. 35, 01.09.2000, p. 27303-27306.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zhang, H, Huang, Q, Ke, N, Matsuyama, S, Hammock, B, Godzik, A & Reed, JC 2000, 'Drosophila pro-apoptotic Bcl-2/Bax homologue reveals evolutionary conservation of cell death mechanisms', Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 275, no. 35, pp. 27303-27306. https://doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M002846200
Zhang, Hong ; Huang, Qihong ; Ke, Ning ; Matsuyama, Shigemi ; Hammock, Bruce ; Godzik, Adam ; Reed, John C. / Drosophila pro-apoptotic Bcl-2/Bax homologue reveals evolutionary conservation of cell death mechanisms. In: Journal of Biological Chemistry. 2000 ; Vol. 275, No. 35. pp. 27303-27306.
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