Dopamine and the mechanisms of cognition: Part I. A neural network model predicting dopamine effects on selective attention

David Servan-Schreiber, Randy M. Bruno, Cameron S Carter, Jonathan D. Cohen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Dopamine affects neural information processing, cognition, and behavior; however, the mechanisms through which these three levels of function are affected have remained unspecified. We present a parallel distributed processing model of dopamine effects on neural ensembles that accounts for effects on human performance in a selective attention task. Methods: Task performance is stimulated using principles and mechanisms that capture salient aspects of information processing in neural ensembles. Dopamine effects are simulated as a change in gain of neural assemblies in the area of release. Results: The model leads to different predictions as a function of the hypothesized location of dopamine effects. Motor system effects are simulated as a change in gain over the response layer of the model. This induces speeding of reaction times but an impairment of accuracy. Cognitive attentional effects are simulated as a change in gain over the attention layer. This induces a speeding of reaction times and an improvement of accuracy, especially at very fast reaction times and when processing of the stimulus requires selective attention. Conclusions: A computer simulation using widely accepted principles of processing in neural ensembles can account for reaction time distributions and time-accuracy curves in a selective attention task. The simulation can be used to generate predictions about the effects of dopamine agonists on performance. An empirical study evaluating these predictions is described in a companion paper.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)713-722
Number of pages10
JournalBiological Psychiatry
Volume43
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - May 15 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dopamine Agents
Neural Networks (Computer)
Cognition
Reaction Time
Dopamine
Automatic Data Processing
Dopamine Agonists
Task Performance and Analysis
Computer Simulation

Keywords

  • Cognitive science
  • Computer simulation models
  • Dopamine
  • Eriksen task
  • Gain
  • Information processing
  • Selective attention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biological Psychiatry

Cite this

Dopamine and the mechanisms of cognition : Part I. A neural network model predicting dopamine effects on selective attention. / Servan-Schreiber, David; Bruno, Randy M.; Carter, Cameron S; Cohen, Jonathan D.

In: Biological Psychiatry, Vol. 43, No. 10, 15.05.1998, p. 713-722.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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