Does vasectomy explain the difference in tubal sterilization rates between black and white women?

Sonya Borrero, Eleanor Schwarz, Matthew F. Reeves, James E. Bost, Mitchell D Creinin, Said A. Ibrahim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To examine whether the observed difference in tubal sterilization rates between black and white women is dependent on racial/ethnic differences in vasectomy rates. Design: Secondary analysis of national, cross-sectional survey. Setting: 2002 National Survey of Family Growth. Patient(s): Women 15 to 44 years old with a current partner who were able to provide information about their partner's vasectomy status. Intervention(s): None. Main Outcome Measure(s): The primary outcome was tubal sterilization. Among women with a current partner who had not undergone vasectomy, a multivariable logistic regression model was used to estimate the effects of race/ethnicity on tubal sterilization after adjusting for potential confounders. Result(s): Of the 3,391 women in the sample, 14% of white women had a current partner who had undergone vasectomy compared with 5% of Hispanic women and 4% of black women. Among the 3,064 women whose partners had not undergone vasectomy, black women were more likely to undergo tubal sterilization (odds ratio: 1.6; 95% confidence interval: 1.1, 2.2) on the basis of adjusted multivariable analysis. Conclusion(s): After controlling for partner vasectomy status, black women were still more likely to undergo tubal sterilization than white women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1642-1645
Number of pages4
JournalFertility and Sterility
Volume91
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG)
  • race/ethnicity
  • tubal sterilization
  • vasectomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Reproductive Medicine

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