Does providing cost-effectiveness information change coverage priorities for citizens acting as social decision makers?

Marthe Rachel Gold, Peter Franks, Taryn Siegelberg, Shoshanna Sofaer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Escalating costs have generated increasing calls for Medicare to use cost-effectiveness as one criterion in determining coverage decisions. Decision-makers in U.S. health care have largely assumed that the public will reject any explicit consideration of cost in coverage policy, but there has been little formal testing of that hypothesis. We tested this assumption in a pilot study in which groups of citizens learned about and discussed health care costs, CEA methods, and common ethical issues embedded in CEA. Participants received information about 14 conditions and treatments and were asked to prioritize them for funding by Medicare under assumptions of constrained resources. Contrary to prevailing assumptions, this diverse sample understood CEA, were largely open to its use, and changed their own funding priorities when given cost-effectiveness ratio information.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)65-72
Number of pages8
JournalHealth Policy
Volume83
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2007

Keywords

  • Cost-effectiveness analysis
  • Deliberative focus groups
  • Medicare
  • Public opinion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Policy

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Does providing cost-effectiveness information change coverage priorities for citizens acting as social decision makers?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this