Does centrality in a cross-sectional network suggest intervention targets for social anxiety disorder?

Thomas L. Rodebaugh, Natasha A. Tonge, Marilyn L. Piccirill, Eiko Fried, Arielle Horenstein, Amanda S. Morrison, Philip R Goldin, James J. Gross, Michelle H. Lim, Katya C. Fernandez, Carlos Blanco, Franklin R. Schneier, Ryan Bogdan, Renee J. Thompson, Richard G. Heimberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Network analysis allows us to identify the most interconnected (i.e., central) symptoms, and multiple authors have suggested that these symptoms might be important treatment targets. This is because change in central symptoms (relative to others) should have greater impact on change in all other symptoms. It has been argued that networks derived from cross-sectional data may help identify such important symptoms. We tested this hypothesis in social anxiety disorder. Method: We first estimated a state-of-The-Art regularized partial correlation network based on participants with social anxiety disorder (n=910) to determine which symptoms were more central. Next, we tested whether change in these central symptoms were indeed more related to overall symptom change in a separate dataset of participants with social anxiety disorder who underwent a variety of treatments (n=244). We also tested.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)831-844
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume86
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018

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Social Phobia
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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Rodebaugh, T. L., Tonge, N. A., Piccirill, M. L., Fried, E., Horenstein, A., Morrison, A. S., ... Heimberg, R. G. (2018). Does centrality in a cross-sectional network suggest intervention targets for social anxiety disorder? Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 86(10), 831-844. https://doi.org/10.1037/ccp0000336

Does centrality in a cross-sectional network suggest intervention targets for social anxiety disorder? / Rodebaugh, Thomas L.; Tonge, Natasha A.; Piccirill, Marilyn L.; Fried, Eiko; Horenstein, Arielle; Morrison, Amanda S.; Goldin, Philip R; Gross, James J.; Lim, Michelle H.; Fernandez, Katya C.; Blanco, Carlos; Schneier, Franklin R.; Bogdan, Ryan; Thompson, Renee J.; Heimberg, Richard G.

In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 86, No. 10, 01.10.2018, p. 831-844.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rodebaugh, TL, Tonge, NA, Piccirill, ML, Fried, E, Horenstein, A, Morrison, AS, Goldin, PR, Gross, JJ, Lim, MH, Fernandez, KC, Blanco, C, Schneier, FR, Bogdan, R, Thompson, RJ & Heimberg, RG 2018, 'Does centrality in a cross-sectional network suggest intervention targets for social anxiety disorder?', Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 86, no. 10, pp. 831-844. https://doi.org/10.1037/ccp0000336
Rodebaugh, Thomas L. ; Tonge, Natasha A. ; Piccirill, Marilyn L. ; Fried, Eiko ; Horenstein, Arielle ; Morrison, Amanda S. ; Goldin, Philip R ; Gross, James J. ; Lim, Michelle H. ; Fernandez, Katya C. ; Blanco, Carlos ; Schneier, Franklin R. ; Bogdan, Ryan ; Thompson, Renee J. ; Heimberg, Richard G. / Does centrality in a cross-sectional network suggest intervention targets for social anxiety disorder?. In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. 2018 ; Vol. 86, No. 10. pp. 831-844.
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