Do PCDD/PCDF standard solutions used in dioxin analysis pose a risk as potentially acutely toxic to lab personnel?

Rainer Malisch, Michael S. Denison, Heidelore Fiedler, Peter Fürst, Ron L.A.P. Hoogenboom, Alexander Schaechtele, Dieter Schrenk, Martin van den Berg

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Laboratory safety requires protecting personnel from chemical exposures. Working with stock solutions of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/PCDFs) in routine analysis of feed and food with bioanalytical or physicochemical methods raises some concerns. Since PCDD/PCDFs are considered as possibly acutely toxic, the potential risks were evaluated to determine whether supervision of their use is necessary. Based on LD50-data for oral or dermal intake, hazard classification of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) as a substance (category 1) and in commercially available TCDD standard solutions (category 4) is different. As worst case exposure scenario during routine laboratory work it was assumed that a dose of 100 ng TCDD gets onto the skin and is absorbed. This would result in the total body burden of a 70 kg person with 15 kg fat increasing from 10 (upper range of current background levels) to ∼17 pg of toxic equivalents (TEQs) of PCDD/PCDFs per g lipid, a level commonly observed over past decades. Chloracne, the main acute effect occurring weeks after exposure, is observed at much higher blood concentrations than estimated from accidental laboratory exposure. Immunotoxicity, developmental effects and other toxic effects may occur at lower blood levels, but require longer periods to develop. Since acute toxic symptoms don't occur within an “8 h acute time window”, no supervision is necessary when working with standard solutions in routine analysis. Nevertheless, precautionary measures are needed regarding long-term adverse health effects and appropriate workplace conditions must exist to ensure that additional occupational exposure to PCDD/PCDFs by laboratory personnel is negligible.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)489-498
Number of pages10
JournalChemosphere
Volume185
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

Fingerprint

Dioxins
Poisons
PCDF
PCDD
dioxin
Personnel
Blood
blood
dibenzofuran
occupational exposure
background level
Oils and fats
workplace
Lipids
fat
skin
Hazards
Skin
Chloracne
lipid

Keywords

  • Acute toxicity
  • Laboratory incidents
  • PCDD/PCDF
  • Safety partnerships
  • Standard solutions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry

Cite this

Malisch, R., Denison, M. S., Fiedler, H., Fürst, P., Hoogenboom, R. L. A. P., Schaechtele, A., ... van den Berg, M. (2017). Do PCDD/PCDF standard solutions used in dioxin analysis pose a risk as potentially acutely toxic to lab personnel? Chemosphere, 185, 489-498. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.07.021

Do PCDD/PCDF standard solutions used in dioxin analysis pose a risk as potentially acutely toxic to lab personnel? / Malisch, Rainer; Denison, Michael S.; Fiedler, Heidelore; Fürst, Peter; Hoogenboom, Ron L.A.P.; Schaechtele, Alexander; Schrenk, Dieter; van den Berg, Martin.

In: Chemosphere, Vol. 185, 01.10.2017, p. 489-498.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Malisch, R, Denison, MS, Fiedler, H, Fürst, P, Hoogenboom, RLAP, Schaechtele, A, Schrenk, D & van den Berg, M 2017, 'Do PCDD/PCDF standard solutions used in dioxin analysis pose a risk as potentially acutely toxic to lab personnel?', Chemosphere, vol. 185, pp. 489-498. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.07.021
Malisch, Rainer ; Denison, Michael S. ; Fiedler, Heidelore ; Fürst, Peter ; Hoogenboom, Ron L.A.P. ; Schaechtele, Alexander ; Schrenk, Dieter ; van den Berg, Martin. / Do PCDD/PCDF standard solutions used in dioxin analysis pose a risk as potentially acutely toxic to lab personnel?. In: Chemosphere. 2017 ; Vol. 185. pp. 489-498.
@article{344b6c13ca5b405e88d9f5f2f0ff33dd,
title = "Do PCDD/PCDF standard solutions used in dioxin analysis pose a risk as potentially acutely toxic to lab personnel?",
abstract = "Laboratory safety requires protecting personnel from chemical exposures. Working with stock solutions of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/PCDFs) in routine analysis of feed and food with bioanalytical or physicochemical methods raises some concerns. Since PCDD/PCDFs are considered as possibly acutely toxic, the potential risks were evaluated to determine whether supervision of their use is necessary. Based on LD50-data for oral or dermal intake, hazard classification of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) as a substance (category 1) and in commercially available TCDD standard solutions (category 4) is different. As worst case exposure scenario during routine laboratory work it was assumed that a dose of 100 ng TCDD gets onto the skin and is absorbed. This would result in the total body burden of a 70 kg person with 15 kg fat increasing from 10 (upper range of current background levels) to ∼17 pg of toxic equivalents (TEQs) of PCDD/PCDFs per g lipid, a level commonly observed over past decades. Chloracne, the main acute effect occurring weeks after exposure, is observed at much higher blood concentrations than estimated from accidental laboratory exposure. Immunotoxicity, developmental effects and other toxic effects may occur at lower blood levels, but require longer periods to develop. Since acute toxic symptoms don't occur within an “8 h acute time window”, no supervision is necessary when working with standard solutions in routine analysis. Nevertheless, precautionary measures are needed regarding long-term adverse health effects and appropriate workplace conditions must exist to ensure that additional occupational exposure to PCDD/PCDFs by laboratory personnel is negligible.",
keywords = "Acute toxicity, Laboratory incidents, PCDD/PCDF, Safety partnerships, Standard solutions",
author = "Rainer Malisch and Denison, {Michael S.} and Heidelore Fiedler and Peter F{\"u}rst and Hoogenboom, {Ron L.A.P.} and Alexander Schaechtele and Dieter Schrenk and {van den Berg}, Martin",
year = "2017",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.07.021",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "185",
pages = "489--498",
journal = "Chemosphere",
issn = "0045-6535",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Do PCDD/PCDF standard solutions used in dioxin analysis pose a risk as potentially acutely toxic to lab personnel?

AU - Malisch, Rainer

AU - Denison, Michael S.

AU - Fiedler, Heidelore

AU - Fürst, Peter

AU - Hoogenboom, Ron L.A.P.

AU - Schaechtele, Alexander

AU - Schrenk, Dieter

AU - van den Berg, Martin

PY - 2017/10/1

Y1 - 2017/10/1

N2 - Laboratory safety requires protecting personnel from chemical exposures. Working with stock solutions of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/PCDFs) in routine analysis of feed and food with bioanalytical or physicochemical methods raises some concerns. Since PCDD/PCDFs are considered as possibly acutely toxic, the potential risks were evaluated to determine whether supervision of their use is necessary. Based on LD50-data for oral or dermal intake, hazard classification of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) as a substance (category 1) and in commercially available TCDD standard solutions (category 4) is different. As worst case exposure scenario during routine laboratory work it was assumed that a dose of 100 ng TCDD gets onto the skin and is absorbed. This would result in the total body burden of a 70 kg person with 15 kg fat increasing from 10 (upper range of current background levels) to ∼17 pg of toxic equivalents (TEQs) of PCDD/PCDFs per g lipid, a level commonly observed over past decades. Chloracne, the main acute effect occurring weeks after exposure, is observed at much higher blood concentrations than estimated from accidental laboratory exposure. Immunotoxicity, developmental effects and other toxic effects may occur at lower blood levels, but require longer periods to develop. Since acute toxic symptoms don't occur within an “8 h acute time window”, no supervision is necessary when working with standard solutions in routine analysis. Nevertheless, precautionary measures are needed regarding long-term adverse health effects and appropriate workplace conditions must exist to ensure that additional occupational exposure to PCDD/PCDFs by laboratory personnel is negligible.

AB - Laboratory safety requires protecting personnel from chemical exposures. Working with stock solutions of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/PCDFs) in routine analysis of feed and food with bioanalytical or physicochemical methods raises some concerns. Since PCDD/PCDFs are considered as possibly acutely toxic, the potential risks were evaluated to determine whether supervision of their use is necessary. Based on LD50-data for oral or dermal intake, hazard classification of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) as a substance (category 1) and in commercially available TCDD standard solutions (category 4) is different. As worst case exposure scenario during routine laboratory work it was assumed that a dose of 100 ng TCDD gets onto the skin and is absorbed. This would result in the total body burden of a 70 kg person with 15 kg fat increasing from 10 (upper range of current background levels) to ∼17 pg of toxic equivalents (TEQs) of PCDD/PCDFs per g lipid, a level commonly observed over past decades. Chloracne, the main acute effect occurring weeks after exposure, is observed at much higher blood concentrations than estimated from accidental laboratory exposure. Immunotoxicity, developmental effects and other toxic effects may occur at lower blood levels, but require longer periods to develop. Since acute toxic symptoms don't occur within an “8 h acute time window”, no supervision is necessary when working with standard solutions in routine analysis. Nevertheless, precautionary measures are needed regarding long-term adverse health effects and appropriate workplace conditions must exist to ensure that additional occupational exposure to PCDD/PCDFs by laboratory personnel is negligible.

KW - Acute toxicity

KW - Laboratory incidents

KW - PCDD/PCDF

KW - Safety partnerships

KW - Standard solutions

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85023610689&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85023610689&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.07.021

DO - 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.07.021

M3 - Review article

C2 - 28715759

AN - SCOPUS:85023610689

VL - 185

SP - 489

EP - 498

JO - Chemosphere

JF - Chemosphere

SN - 0045-6535

ER -