Do long-term HDL-C declines associated with a first birth vary by apo E phenotype? the coronary artery risk development in young adults (CARDIA) study

Erica P. Gunderson, Rachel Whitmer, Cora E. Lewis, Charles P. Quesenberry, Delia Smith West, Stephen Sidney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels in premenopausal and postmenopausal women are differentially affected by exogenous sex hormones depending on their apolipoprotein E (apo E) genotype. Because endogenous sex hormones markedly increase during pregnancy, we examined whether HDL-C declines after a first birth varied by apo E polymorphisms. Methods: In 1147 nulliparas (416 black, 731 white), fasting blood samples (nonpregnant) were drawn at baseline and at follow-up years 5, 7, and 10. Time-dependent pregnancy groups included 0 pregnancies (P0), 1+ short pregnancy (P1+), 1 birth (B1), 2 or more births (B2+). ApoE groups by alleles identified with a phenotype method included E4 (4/3 and 4/4), E3 (3/3), and E2 (2/2 and 3/2). Differences in adjusted mean HDL-C changes among pregnancy groups and ApoE groups were examined using repeated measures multiple linear regression. Results: HDL-C declines associated with parity (one or more births) depended on ApoE group (ApoE*Pregnancy Interaction; p < 0.002). For B1 and B2+ vs. P0, HDL-C declines were -2.4 to -2.7 mg/dl in E4 and -3.4 to -4.1 mg/dl in E3. In E2, HDL-C declines were -6.6 mg/dl for one birth, and -11.5 mg/dl for two or more births, each relative to the 0 pregnancies (P0) group (linear trend, p < 0.001). Conclusions: The degree to which childbearing adversely affects long-term HDL-C declines varies by apo E phenotype, based on a method that accurately classifies genotype. Our findings show that 2/2 and 3/2 genotypes are associated with larger parity-related HDL-C declines than 3/3, 4/3, and 4/4 genotypes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)917-928
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Women's Health
Volume14
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Birth Order
Apolipoproteins E
HDL Cholesterol
Young Adult
Coronary Vessels
Phenotype
Pregnancy
Parturition
Genotype
Gonadal Steroid Hormones
Parity
Linear Models
Fasting
Alleles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Do long-term HDL-C declines associated with a first birth vary by apo E phenotype? the coronary artery risk development in young adults (CARDIA) study. / Gunderson, Erica P.; Whitmer, Rachel; Lewis, Cora E.; Quesenberry, Charles P.; West, Delia Smith; Sidney, Stephen.

In: Journal of Women's Health, Vol. 14, No. 10, 01.12.2005, p. 917-928.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gunderson, Erica P. ; Whitmer, Rachel ; Lewis, Cora E. ; Quesenberry, Charles P. ; West, Delia Smith ; Sidney, Stephen. / Do long-term HDL-C declines associated with a first birth vary by apo E phenotype? the coronary artery risk development in young adults (CARDIA) study. In: Journal of Women's Health. 2005 ; Vol. 14, No. 10. pp. 917-928.
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abstract = "Background: High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels in premenopausal and postmenopausal women are differentially affected by exogenous sex hormones depending on their apolipoprotein E (apo E) genotype. Because endogenous sex hormones markedly increase during pregnancy, we examined whether HDL-C declines after a first birth varied by apo E polymorphisms. Methods: In 1147 nulliparas (416 black, 731 white), fasting blood samples (nonpregnant) were drawn at baseline and at follow-up years 5, 7, and 10. Time-dependent pregnancy groups included 0 pregnancies (P0), 1+ short pregnancy (P1+), 1 birth (B1), 2 or more births (B2+). ApoE groups by alleles identified with a phenotype method included E4 (4/3 and 4/4), E3 (3/3), and E2 (2/2 and 3/2). Differences in adjusted mean HDL-C changes among pregnancy groups and ApoE groups were examined using repeated measures multiple linear regression. Results: HDL-C declines associated with parity (one or more births) depended on ApoE group (ApoE*Pregnancy Interaction; p < 0.002). For B1 and B2+ vs. P0, HDL-C declines were -2.4 to -2.7 mg/dl in E4 and -3.4 to -4.1 mg/dl in E3. In E2, HDL-C declines were -6.6 mg/dl for one birth, and -11.5 mg/dl for two or more births, each relative to the 0 pregnancies (P0) group (linear trend, p < 0.001). Conclusions: The degree to which childbearing adversely affects long-term HDL-C declines varies by apo E phenotype, based on a method that accurately classifies genotype. Our findings show that 2/2 and 3/2 genotypes are associated with larger parity-related HDL-C declines than 3/3, 4/3, and 4/4 genotypes.",
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AU - Quesenberry, Charles P.

AU - West, Delia Smith

AU - Sidney, Stephen

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AB - Background: High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels in premenopausal and postmenopausal women are differentially affected by exogenous sex hormones depending on their apolipoprotein E (apo E) genotype. Because endogenous sex hormones markedly increase during pregnancy, we examined whether HDL-C declines after a first birth varied by apo E polymorphisms. Methods: In 1147 nulliparas (416 black, 731 white), fasting blood samples (nonpregnant) were drawn at baseline and at follow-up years 5, 7, and 10. Time-dependent pregnancy groups included 0 pregnancies (P0), 1+ short pregnancy (P1+), 1 birth (B1), 2 or more births (B2+). ApoE groups by alleles identified with a phenotype method included E4 (4/3 and 4/4), E3 (3/3), and E2 (2/2 and 3/2). Differences in adjusted mean HDL-C changes among pregnancy groups and ApoE groups were examined using repeated measures multiple linear regression. Results: HDL-C declines associated with parity (one or more births) depended on ApoE group (ApoE*Pregnancy Interaction; p < 0.002). For B1 and B2+ vs. P0, HDL-C declines were -2.4 to -2.7 mg/dl in E4 and -3.4 to -4.1 mg/dl in E3. In E2, HDL-C declines were -6.6 mg/dl for one birth, and -11.5 mg/dl for two or more births, each relative to the 0 pregnancies (P0) group (linear trend, p < 0.001). Conclusions: The degree to which childbearing adversely affects long-term HDL-C declines varies by apo E phenotype, based on a method that accurately classifies genotype. Our findings show that 2/2 and 3/2 genotypes are associated with larger parity-related HDL-C declines than 3/3, 4/3, and 4/4 genotypes.

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