Distribution of leucocyte subsets in the canine respiratory tract

D. Peeters, M. J. Day, F. Farnir, Peter F Moore, C. Clercx

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Histochemistry and immunohistochemistry were used to characterize leucocyte subsets in the respiratory tract of 15 outbred dogs (five aged <6 months and 10 aged >1 year) that had no evidence of respiratory disease. No organized nose- or bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue was observed in any of the sections examined. IgA+ plasma cells predominated in nasal mucosa and in all parts of the bronchial tree, with fewer IgG+ and IgM+ plasma cells. The numbers of IgA+ and IgM+ cells were significantly greater in the nasal mucosa than in any other part of the respiratory mucosa. There were significantly fewer IgA+, IgG+ and IgM+ cells in all parts of the respiratory tract in the puppies than in the adults. The number and distribution of mast cells and cells expressing MHC class II, L1 or CD1c were recorded. Mast cells were mainly found in the subepithelial lamina propria of nasal and bronchial mucosa and in the alveolar interstitium, and cells expressing IgE had a similar distribution. Mast cells were also present within muscle layers of the bronchial tree. The numbers of mast cells and MHC class II+ cells were significantly greater in the nasal mucosa than in any other part of the respiratory mucosa. In the nose, carina and primary and secondary bronchus, there were significantly more mast cells and MHC class II+ cells in puppies than in adult dogs, whereas the numbers of L1+ cells and CD1c+ cells in most sites were significantly greater in older dogs. There were significantly more CD3+ and CD8+ cells in the nasal mucosa than in any part of the bronchial mucosa. In most parts of the respiratory mucosa, CD4+, CD8+ and TCR αβ+ cells were present in significantly greater numbers in adults than in puppies. All parts of the respiratory tract had similar numbers of mucosal CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes. TCR γδ+ cells were absent or sparse in all samples. These data, obtained from dogs without respiratory disease, will enable comparisons to be made with dogs suffering from infectious or inflammatory nasal, bronchial and pulmonary diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)261-272
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Comparative Pathology
Volume132
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2005

Fingerprint

respiratory system
Respiratory System
Canidae
leukocytes
Leukocytes
Nasal Mucosa
dogs
Mast Cells
mast cells
nasal mucosa
Respiratory Mucosa
Dogs
respiratory mucosa
cells
Bronchi
bronchi
Immunoglobulin A
puppies
Immunoglobulin M
respiratory tract diseases

Keywords

  • Dog
  • Leucocyte subsets
  • Respiratory immune system

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

Distribution of leucocyte subsets in the canine respiratory tract. / Peeters, D.; Day, M. J.; Farnir, F.; Moore, Peter F; Clercx, C.

In: Journal of Comparative Pathology, Vol. 132, No. 4, 05.2005, p. 261-272.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Peeters, D. ; Day, M. J. ; Farnir, F. ; Moore, Peter F ; Clercx, C. / Distribution of leucocyte subsets in the canine respiratory tract. In: Journal of Comparative Pathology. 2005 ; Vol. 132, No. 4. pp. 261-272.
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