Dissociating the role of the dorsolateral prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex in cognitive control

Angus W. MacDonald, Jonathan D. Cohen, V. Andrew Stenger, Cameron S Carter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2458 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Theories of the regulation of cognition suggest a system with two necessary components: One to implement control and another to monitor performance and signal when adjustments in control are needed. Event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging and a task-switching version of the Stroop task were used to examine whether these components of cognitive control have distinct neural bases in the human brain. A double dissociation was found. During task preparation, the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann's area 9) was more active for color naming than for word reading, consistent with a role in the implementation of control. In contrast, the anterior cingulate cortex (Brodmann's areas 24 and 32) was more active when responding to incongruent stimuli, consistent with a role in performance monitoring.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1835-1838
Number of pages4
JournalScience
Volume288
Issue number5472
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 9 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Social Adjustment
Gyrus Cinguli
Prefrontal Cortex
Cognition
Reading
Color
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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Dissociating the role of the dorsolateral prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex in cognitive control. / MacDonald, Angus W.; Cohen, Jonathan D.; Andrew Stenger, V.; Carter, Cameron S.

In: Science, Vol. 288, No. 5472, 09.06.2000, p. 1835-1838.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

MacDonald, Angus W. ; Cohen, Jonathan D. ; Andrew Stenger, V. ; Carter, Cameron S. / Dissociating the role of the dorsolateral prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex in cognitive control. In: Science. 2000 ; Vol. 288, No. 5472. pp. 1835-1838.
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