Diseases of captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus): Results of the cheetah research council pathology survey, 1989–1992

Linda Munson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

77 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Knowledge of the diseases of cheetahs is essential to prevent and treat conditions that can modulate fertility and longevity. Toward this aim, a comprehensive pathology survey was conducted under a directive from the Cheetah Species Survival Plan. To date, 31 adult cheetahs and nine cubs from 16 zoological parks have been evaluated. Also, liver biopsies from 67 female cheetahs from 22 zoological parks were examined. Veno‐occlusive disease (VOD) affected 82% of deceased cheetahs and 51% of live female cheetahs, and was the cause of death in nine cheetahs. Glomerulosclerosis and nephrosclerosis affected 84% and 39% of the population, respectively, and caused renal failure in eight cheetahs. The severity of VOD and glomerulosclerosis increased with age, and was not associated with infertility. Chronic gastritis was noted in 91% of the study population, and 95% of these cases also had spiral bacteria. Feline infectious peritonitis caused the death of two cheetahs. Male cheetahs had testicular degeneration, atrophy, and/or spermatogenic arrest, but these cheetahs also had severe systemic illness. Most females did not have reproductive tract lesions that would cause infertility, including those with parovarian cysts. Ovarian histology suggested that infertile cheetahs were not ovulating. Most cubs died from pneumonia or other systemic infections. The results of this study indicate that serious diseases are prevalent in the North American cheetahs, but these diseases do not appear to be the cause of infertility in the population. However, these diseases do limit the life span and well‐being of cheetahs in captivity. Further research is needed to elucidate the causes of these diseases. © 1993 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)105-124
Number of pages20
JournalZoo Biology
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Acinonyx jubatus
zoos
death
feline infectious peritonitis
gastritis
renal failure
atrophy
lesions (animal)
disease severity
pneumonia
histology

Keywords

  • gastritis
  • Gastrospirillum
  • glomerulosclerosis
  • Helicobacter
  • parovarian cysts
  • veno‐occlusive disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

Diseases of captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) : Results of the cheetah research council pathology survey, 1989–1992. / Munson, Linda.

In: Zoo Biology, Vol. 12, No. 1, 1993, p. 105-124.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{54ac3a57e9f647019503bc72bd8f7c27,
title = "Diseases of captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus): Results of the cheetah research council pathology survey, 1989–1992",
abstract = "Knowledge of the diseases of cheetahs is essential to prevent and treat conditions that can modulate fertility and longevity. Toward this aim, a comprehensive pathology survey was conducted under a directive from the Cheetah Species Survival Plan. To date, 31 adult cheetahs and nine cubs from 16 zoological parks have been evaluated. Also, liver biopsies from 67 female cheetahs from 22 zoological parks were examined. Veno‐occlusive disease (VOD) affected 82{\%} of deceased cheetahs and 51{\%} of live female cheetahs, and was the cause of death in nine cheetahs. Glomerulosclerosis and nephrosclerosis affected 84{\%} and 39{\%} of the population, respectively, and caused renal failure in eight cheetahs. The severity of VOD and glomerulosclerosis increased with age, and was not associated with infertility. Chronic gastritis was noted in 91{\%} of the study population, and 95{\%} of these cases also had spiral bacteria. Feline infectious peritonitis caused the death of two cheetahs. Male cheetahs had testicular degeneration, atrophy, and/or spermatogenic arrest, but these cheetahs also had severe systemic illness. Most females did not have reproductive tract lesions that would cause infertility, including those with parovarian cysts. Ovarian histology suggested that infertile cheetahs were not ovulating. Most cubs died from pneumonia or other systemic infections. The results of this study indicate that serious diseases are prevalent in the North American cheetahs, but these diseases do not appear to be the cause of infertility in the population. However, these diseases do limit the life span and well‐being of cheetahs in captivity. Further research is needed to elucidate the causes of these diseases. {\circledC} 1993 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.",
keywords = "gastritis, Gastrospirillum, glomerulosclerosis, Helicobacter, parovarian cysts, veno‐occlusive disease",
author = "Linda Munson",
year = "1993",
doi = "10.1002/zoo.1430120110",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
pages = "105--124",
journal = "Zoo Biology",
issn = "0733-3188",
publisher = "Wiley-Liss Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Diseases of captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus)

T2 - Results of the cheetah research council pathology survey, 1989–1992

AU - Munson, Linda

PY - 1993

Y1 - 1993

N2 - Knowledge of the diseases of cheetahs is essential to prevent and treat conditions that can modulate fertility and longevity. Toward this aim, a comprehensive pathology survey was conducted under a directive from the Cheetah Species Survival Plan. To date, 31 adult cheetahs and nine cubs from 16 zoological parks have been evaluated. Also, liver biopsies from 67 female cheetahs from 22 zoological parks were examined. Veno‐occlusive disease (VOD) affected 82% of deceased cheetahs and 51% of live female cheetahs, and was the cause of death in nine cheetahs. Glomerulosclerosis and nephrosclerosis affected 84% and 39% of the population, respectively, and caused renal failure in eight cheetahs. The severity of VOD and glomerulosclerosis increased with age, and was not associated with infertility. Chronic gastritis was noted in 91% of the study population, and 95% of these cases also had spiral bacteria. Feline infectious peritonitis caused the death of two cheetahs. Male cheetahs had testicular degeneration, atrophy, and/or spermatogenic arrest, but these cheetahs also had severe systemic illness. Most females did not have reproductive tract lesions that would cause infertility, including those with parovarian cysts. Ovarian histology suggested that infertile cheetahs were not ovulating. Most cubs died from pneumonia or other systemic infections. The results of this study indicate that serious diseases are prevalent in the North American cheetahs, but these diseases do not appear to be the cause of infertility in the population. However, these diseases do limit the life span and well‐being of cheetahs in captivity. Further research is needed to elucidate the causes of these diseases. © 1993 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

AB - Knowledge of the diseases of cheetahs is essential to prevent and treat conditions that can modulate fertility and longevity. Toward this aim, a comprehensive pathology survey was conducted under a directive from the Cheetah Species Survival Plan. To date, 31 adult cheetahs and nine cubs from 16 zoological parks have been evaluated. Also, liver biopsies from 67 female cheetahs from 22 zoological parks were examined. Veno‐occlusive disease (VOD) affected 82% of deceased cheetahs and 51% of live female cheetahs, and was the cause of death in nine cheetahs. Glomerulosclerosis and nephrosclerosis affected 84% and 39% of the population, respectively, and caused renal failure in eight cheetahs. The severity of VOD and glomerulosclerosis increased with age, and was not associated with infertility. Chronic gastritis was noted in 91% of the study population, and 95% of these cases also had spiral bacteria. Feline infectious peritonitis caused the death of two cheetahs. Male cheetahs had testicular degeneration, atrophy, and/or spermatogenic arrest, but these cheetahs also had severe systemic illness. Most females did not have reproductive tract lesions that would cause infertility, including those with parovarian cysts. Ovarian histology suggested that infertile cheetahs were not ovulating. Most cubs died from pneumonia or other systemic infections. The results of this study indicate that serious diseases are prevalent in the North American cheetahs, but these diseases do not appear to be the cause of infertility in the population. However, these diseases do limit the life span and well‐being of cheetahs in captivity. Further research is needed to elucidate the causes of these diseases. © 1993 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

KW - gastritis

KW - Gastrospirillum

KW - glomerulosclerosis

KW - Helicobacter

KW - parovarian cysts

KW - veno‐occlusive disease

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84995153623&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84995153623&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/zoo.1430120110

DO - 10.1002/zoo.1430120110

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84995153623

VL - 12

SP - 105

EP - 124

JO - Zoo Biology

JF - Zoo Biology

SN - 0733-3188

IS - 1

ER -