Directing the mind's eye

Prefrontal, inferior and medial temporal mechanisms for visual working memory

Charan Ranganath, Mark D'Esposito

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

159 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human and nonhuman primates have a remarkable ability to recall, maintain and manipulate visual images in the absence of external sensory stimulation. Evidence from lesion, single-unit neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies shows that these visual working memory processes are consistently associated with sustained activity in object-selective inferior temporal neurons. Furthermore, results from these studies suggest that mnemonic activity in the inferior temporal cortex is, in turn, supported by top-down inputs from multimodal regions in prefrontal and medial temporal cortex, and under some circumstances, from the hippocampus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)175-182
Number of pages8
JournalCurrent Opinion in Neurobiology
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2005

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Temporal Lobe
Short-Term Memory
Aptitude
Neuroimaging
Primates
Hippocampus
Neurons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Directing the mind's eye : Prefrontal, inferior and medial temporal mechanisms for visual working memory. / Ranganath, Charan; D'Esposito, Mark.

In: Current Opinion in Neurobiology, Vol. 15, No. 2, 04.2005, p. 175-182.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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