Direct video-microscopic observation of the dynamic effects of medical ultrasound on ultrasound contrast microspheres

Alexander L. Klibanov, Katherine W. Ferrara, Michael S. Hughes, James H. Wible, Jolette K. Wojdyla, Paul A. Dayton, Karen E. Morgan, Gary H. Brandenburger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES. Ultrasound can cause destruction of microbubble contrast agents used to enhance medical ultrasound imaging. This study sought to characterize the dynamics of this interaction by direct visual observation of microbubbles during insonification in vitro by a medical ultrasound imaging system. METHODS. Video microscopy was used to observe air-filled sonicated albumin microspheres adsorbed to a solid support during insonation. RESULTS. Deflation was not observed at lowest transmit power settings. At higher intensities, gas left the microparticle gradually, apparently dissolving into the surrounding medium. Deflation was slower for higher microsphere surface densities. Intermittent ultrasound imaging (0.5 Hz refresh rate) caused slower deflation than continuous imaging (33 Hz). CONCLUSIONS. Higher concentrations of microbubbles, lower ultrasound transmit power settings, and intermittent imaging each can reduce the rate of destruction of microspheres resulting from medical ultrasound insonation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)863-870
Number of pages8
JournalInvestigative Radiology
Volume33
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Microbubbles
Microspheres
Ultrasonography
Diagnostic Imaging
Video Microscopy
Contrast Media
Albumins
Gases
Air
Observation

Keywords

  • Contrast agents
  • Destruction
  • Intermittent imaging
  • Microbubbles
  • Ultrasound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Klibanov, A. L., Ferrara, K. W., Hughes, M. S., Wible, J. H., Wojdyla, J. K., Dayton, P. A., ... Brandenburger, G. H. (1998). Direct video-microscopic observation of the dynamic effects of medical ultrasound on ultrasound contrast microspheres. Investigative Radiology, 33(12), 863-870. https://doi.org/10.1097/00004424-199812000-00004

Direct video-microscopic observation of the dynamic effects of medical ultrasound on ultrasound contrast microspheres. / Klibanov, Alexander L.; Ferrara, Katherine W.; Hughes, Michael S.; Wible, James H.; Wojdyla, Jolette K.; Dayton, Paul A.; Morgan, Karen E.; Brandenburger, Gary H.

In: Investigative Radiology, Vol. 33, No. 12, 12.1998, p. 863-870.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Klibanov, AL, Ferrara, KW, Hughes, MS, Wible, JH, Wojdyla, JK, Dayton, PA, Morgan, KE & Brandenburger, GH 1998, 'Direct video-microscopic observation of the dynamic effects of medical ultrasound on ultrasound contrast microspheres', Investigative Radiology, vol. 33, no. 12, pp. 863-870. https://doi.org/10.1097/00004424-199812000-00004
Klibanov, Alexander L. ; Ferrara, Katherine W. ; Hughes, Michael S. ; Wible, James H. ; Wojdyla, Jolette K. ; Dayton, Paul A. ; Morgan, Karen E. ; Brandenburger, Gary H. / Direct video-microscopic observation of the dynamic effects of medical ultrasound on ultrasound contrast microspheres. In: Investigative Radiology. 1998 ; Vol. 33, No. 12. pp. 863-870.
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