Direct protein kinase C-dependent phosphorylation regulates the cell surface stability and activity of the potassium chloride cotransporter KCC2

Henry H C Lee, Joshua A. Walker, Jeffery R. Williams, Richard J. Goodier, John A Payne, Stephen J. Moss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The potassium chloride cotransporter KCC2 plays a major role in the maintenance of transmembrane chloride potential in mature neurons; thus KCC2 activity is critical for hyperpolarizing membrane currents generated upon the activation of γ-aminobutyric acid type A and glycine (Gly) receptors that underlie fast synaptic inhibition in the adult central nervous system. However, to date an understanding of the cellular mechanism that neurons use to modulate the functional expression of KCC2 remains rudimentary. Using Escherichia coli expression coupled with in vitro kinase assays, we first established that protein kinase C (PKC) can directly phosphorylate serine 940 (Ser940) within the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of KCC2. We further demonstrated that Ser940 is the major site for PKC-dependent phosphorylation for full-length KCC2 molecules when expressed in HEK-293 cells. Phosphorylation of Ser940 increased the cell surface stability of KCC2 in this system by decreasing its rate of internalization from the plasma membrane. Coincident phosphorylation of Ser940 increased the rate of ion transport by KCC2. It was further evident that phosphorylation of endogenous KCC2 in cultured hippocampal neurons is regulated by PKC-dependent activity. Moreover, in keeping with our recombinant studies, enhancing PKC-dependent phosphorylation increased the targeting of KCC2 to the neuronal cell surface. Our studies thus suggest that PKC-dependent phosphorylation of KCC2 may play a central role in modulating both the functional expression of this critical transporter in the brain and the strength of synaptic inhibition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)29777-29784
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume282
Issue number41
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 12 2007

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Phosphorylation
Protein Kinase C
Serine
Neurons
Aminobutyrates
Glycine Receptors
HEK293 Cells
Ion Transport
Neurology
Cell membranes
Membrane Potentials
Escherichia coli
potassium-chloride symporters
Chlorides
Assays
Brain
Phosphotransferases
Central Nervous System
Chemical activation
Maintenance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Direct protein kinase C-dependent phosphorylation regulates the cell surface stability and activity of the potassium chloride cotransporter KCC2. / Lee, Henry H C; Walker, Joshua A.; Williams, Jeffery R.; Goodier, Richard J.; Payne, John A; Moss, Stephen J.

In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 282, No. 41, 12.10.2007, p. 29777-29784.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, Henry H C ; Walker, Joshua A. ; Williams, Jeffery R. ; Goodier, Richard J. ; Payne, John A ; Moss, Stephen J. / Direct protein kinase C-dependent phosphorylation regulates the cell surface stability and activity of the potassium chloride cotransporter KCC2. In: Journal of Biological Chemistry. 2007 ; Vol. 282, No. 41. pp. 29777-29784.
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