Direct photochemical patterning and refunctionalization of supported phospholipid bilayers

Chanel K. Yee, Meri L. Amweg, Atul N. Parikh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A wet photolithographic route for micropatterning fluid phospholipid bilayers is demonstrated in which spatially directed illumination by short-wavelength ultraviolet radiation results in highly localized photochemical degradation of the exposed lipids. Using this method, we can directly engineer patterns of hydrophilic voids within a fluid membrane as well as isolated membrane corrals over large substrate areas. We show that the lipid-free regions can be refilled by the same or other lipids and lipid mixtures which establish contiguity with the existing membrane, thereby providing a synthetic means for manipulating membrane compositions, engineering metastable membrane microdomains, probing 2D lipid-lipid mixing, and designing membrane-embedded arrays of soluble proteins. Following this route, new constructs can be envisaged for high-throughput membrane proteomic, biosensor array, and spatially directed, aqueous- phase material synthesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13962-13972
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of the American Chemical Society
Volume126
Issue number43
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 3 2004

Fingerprint

Phospholipids
Lipids
Membranes
Membrane Microdomains
Protein Array Analysis
Biosensing Techniques
Fluids
Lighting
Proteomics
Biosensors
Ultraviolet radiation
Radiation
Throughput
Proteins
Engineers
Degradation
Wavelength
Substrates
Chemical analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)

Cite this

Direct photochemical patterning and refunctionalization of supported phospholipid bilayers. / Yee, Chanel K.; Amweg, Meri L.; Parikh, Atul N.

In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, Vol. 126, No. 43, 03.11.2004, p. 13962-13972.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yee, Chanel K. ; Amweg, Meri L. ; Parikh, Atul N. / Direct photochemical patterning and refunctionalization of supported phospholipid bilayers. In: Journal of the American Chemical Society. 2004 ; Vol. 126, No. 43. pp. 13962-13972.
@article{3afe057ab4b84c909002278219c1612c,
title = "Direct photochemical patterning and refunctionalization of supported phospholipid bilayers",
abstract = "A wet photolithographic route for micropatterning fluid phospholipid bilayers is demonstrated in which spatially directed illumination by short-wavelength ultraviolet radiation results in highly localized photochemical degradation of the exposed lipids. Using this method, we can directly engineer patterns of hydrophilic voids within a fluid membrane as well as isolated membrane corrals over large substrate areas. We show that the lipid-free regions can be refilled by the same or other lipids and lipid mixtures which establish contiguity with the existing membrane, thereby providing a synthetic means for manipulating membrane compositions, engineering metastable membrane microdomains, probing 2D lipid-lipid mixing, and designing membrane-embedded arrays of soluble proteins. Following this route, new constructs can be envisaged for high-throughput membrane proteomic, biosensor array, and spatially directed, aqueous- phase material synthesis.",
author = "Yee, {Chanel K.} and Amweg, {Meri L.} and Parikh, {Atul N.}",
year = "2004",
month = "11",
day = "3",
doi = "10.1021/ja047714k",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "126",
pages = "13962--13972",
journal = "Journal of the American Chemical Society",
issn = "0002-7863",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",
number = "43",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Direct photochemical patterning and refunctionalization of supported phospholipid bilayers

AU - Yee, Chanel K.

AU - Amweg, Meri L.

AU - Parikh, Atul N.

PY - 2004/11/3

Y1 - 2004/11/3

N2 - A wet photolithographic route for micropatterning fluid phospholipid bilayers is demonstrated in which spatially directed illumination by short-wavelength ultraviolet radiation results in highly localized photochemical degradation of the exposed lipids. Using this method, we can directly engineer patterns of hydrophilic voids within a fluid membrane as well as isolated membrane corrals over large substrate areas. We show that the lipid-free regions can be refilled by the same or other lipids and lipid mixtures which establish contiguity with the existing membrane, thereby providing a synthetic means for manipulating membrane compositions, engineering metastable membrane microdomains, probing 2D lipid-lipid mixing, and designing membrane-embedded arrays of soluble proteins. Following this route, new constructs can be envisaged for high-throughput membrane proteomic, biosensor array, and spatially directed, aqueous- phase material synthesis.

AB - A wet photolithographic route for micropatterning fluid phospholipid bilayers is demonstrated in which spatially directed illumination by short-wavelength ultraviolet radiation results in highly localized photochemical degradation of the exposed lipids. Using this method, we can directly engineer patterns of hydrophilic voids within a fluid membrane as well as isolated membrane corrals over large substrate areas. We show that the lipid-free regions can be refilled by the same or other lipids and lipid mixtures which establish contiguity with the existing membrane, thereby providing a synthetic means for manipulating membrane compositions, engineering metastable membrane microdomains, probing 2D lipid-lipid mixing, and designing membrane-embedded arrays of soluble proteins. Following this route, new constructs can be envisaged for high-throughput membrane proteomic, biosensor array, and spatially directed, aqueous- phase material synthesis.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=7444253461&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=7444253461&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1021/ja047714k

DO - 10.1021/ja047714k

M3 - Article

C2 - 15506757

AN - SCOPUS:7444253461

VL - 126

SP - 13962

EP - 13972

JO - Journal of the American Chemical Society

JF - Journal of the American Chemical Society

SN - 0002-7863

IS - 43

ER -