Diminished hematopoietic activity associated with alterations in innate and adaptive immunity in a mouse model of human monocytic ehrlichiosis

Katherine C. MacNamara, Rachael Racine, Madhumouli Chatterjee, Dori L Borjesson, Gary M. Winslow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME) is a tick-borne disease caused by Ehrlichia chaffeensis. Patients exhibit diagnostically important hematological changes, including anemia and thrombocytopenia, although the basis of the abnormalities is unknown. To begin to understand these changes, we used a mouse model of ehrlichiosis to determine whether the observed hematological changes induced by infection are associated with altered hematopoietic activity. Infection with Ehrlichia muris, a pathogen closely related to E. chaffeensis, resulted in anemia, thrombocytopenia, and a marked reduction in bone marrow cellularity. CFU assays, conducted on days 10 and 15 postinfection, revealed a striking decrease in multipotential myeloid and erythroid progenitors. These changes were accompanied by an increase in the frequency of immature granulocytes in the bone marrow and a decrease in the frequency of B lymphocytes. Equally striking changes were observed in spleen cellularity and architecture, and infected mice exhibited extensive extramedullary hematopoiesis. Splenomegaly, a characteristic feature of E. muris infection, was associated with an expanded and disorganized marginal zone and a nearly 66-fold increase in the level of Ter119+ erythroid cells, indicative of splenic erythropoiesis. We hypothesize that inflammation associated with ehrlichia infection suppresses bone marrow function, induces the emigration of B cells, and establishes hematopoietic activity in the spleen. We propose that these changes, which may be essential for providing the innate and acquired immune cells to fight infection, are also responsible in part for blood cytopenias and other clinical features of HME.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4061-4069
Number of pages9
JournalInfection and Immunity
Volume77
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2009

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Ehrlichiosis
Adaptive Immunity
Innate Immunity
Ehrlichia chaffeensis
Ehrlichia
Infection
Bone Marrow
Thrombocytopenia
Anemia
B-Lymphocytes
Spleen
Extramedullary Hematopoiesis
Tick-Borne Diseases
Erythroid Cells
Erythropoiesis
Splenomegaly
Emigration and Immigration
Granulocytes
Inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Microbiology
  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Diminished hematopoietic activity associated with alterations in innate and adaptive immunity in a mouse model of human monocytic ehrlichiosis. / MacNamara, Katherine C.; Racine, Rachael; Chatterjee, Madhumouli; Borjesson, Dori L; Winslow, Gary M.

In: Infection and Immunity, Vol. 77, No. 9, 09.2009, p. 4061-4069.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

MacNamara, Katherine C. ; Racine, Rachael ; Chatterjee, Madhumouli ; Borjesson, Dori L ; Winslow, Gary M. / Diminished hematopoietic activity associated with alterations in innate and adaptive immunity in a mouse model of human monocytic ehrlichiosis. In: Infection and Immunity. 2009 ; Vol. 77, No. 9. pp. 4061-4069.
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