Diffusible, nonfibrillar ligands derived from Aβ1-42 are potent central nervous system neurotoxins

M. P. Lambert, A. K. Barlow, B. A. Chromy, C. Edwards, R. Freed, M. Liosatos, T. E. Morgan, I. Rozovsky, B. Trommer, K. L. Viola, P. Wals, C. Zhang, C. E. Finch, G. A. Krafft, W. L. Klein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2742 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

1-42 is a self-associating peptide whose neurotoxic derivatives are thought to play a role in Alzheimer's pathogenesis. Neurotoxicity of amyloid β protein (Aβ) has been attributed to its fibrillar forms, but experiments presented here characterize neurotoxins that assemble when fibril formation is inhibited. These neurotoxins comprise small diffusible Aβ oligomers (referred to as ADDLs, for Aβ-derived diffusible ligands), which were found to kill mature neurons in organotypic central nervous system cultures at nanomolar concentrations. At cell surfaces, ADDLs bound to trypsin-sensitive sites and surface-derived tryptic peptides blocked binding and afforded neuroprotection. Germ-line knockout of Fyn, a protein tyrosine kinase linked to apoptosis and elevated in Alzheimer's disease, also was neuroprotective. Remarkably, neurological dysfunction evoked by ADDLs occurred well in advance of cellular degeneration. Without lag, and despite retention of evoked action potentials, ADDLs inhibited hippocampal long-term potentiation, indicating an immediate impact on signal transduction. We hypothesize that impaired synaptic plasticity and associated memory dysfunction during early stage Alzheimer's disease and severe cellular degeneration and dementia during end stage could be caused by the biphasic impact of Aβ-derived diffusible ligands acting upon particular neural signal transduction pathways.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6448-6453
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume95
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - May 26 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Neurotoxins
Signal Transduction
Alzheimer Disease
Central Nervous System
Ligands
Serum Amyloid A Protein
Peptides
Neuronal Plasticity
Long-Term Potentiation
Evoked Potentials
Germ Cells
Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
Trypsin
Action Potentials
Dementia
Apoptosis
Neurons
Neuroprotection
Retention (Psychology)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • General

Cite this

Diffusible, nonfibrillar ligands derived from Aβ1-42 are potent central nervous system neurotoxins. / Lambert, M. P.; Barlow, A. K.; Chromy, B. A.; Edwards, C.; Freed, R.; Liosatos, M.; Morgan, T. E.; Rozovsky, I.; Trommer, B.; Viola, K. L.; Wals, P.; Zhang, C.; Finch, C. E.; Krafft, G. A.; Klein, W. L.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 95, No. 11, 26.05.1998, p. 6448-6453.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lambert, MP, Barlow, AK, Chromy, BA, Edwards, C, Freed, R, Liosatos, M, Morgan, TE, Rozovsky, I, Trommer, B, Viola, KL, Wals, P, Zhang, C, Finch, CE, Krafft, GA & Klein, WL 1998, 'Diffusible, nonfibrillar ligands derived from Aβ1-42 are potent central nervous system neurotoxins', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 95, no. 11, pp. 6448-6453. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.95.11.6448
Lambert, M. P. ; Barlow, A. K. ; Chromy, B. A. ; Edwards, C. ; Freed, R. ; Liosatos, M. ; Morgan, T. E. ; Rozovsky, I. ; Trommer, B. ; Viola, K. L. ; Wals, P. ; Zhang, C. ; Finch, C. E. ; Krafft, G. A. ; Klein, W. L. / Diffusible, nonfibrillar ligands derived from Aβ1-42 are potent central nervous system neurotoxins. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 1998 ; Vol. 95, No. 11. pp. 6448-6453.
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AU - Morgan, T. E.

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AU - Wals, P.

AU - Zhang, C.

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