Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis association with thoracic spine kyphosis: A cross-sectional study for the health aging and body composition study

Lorenzo Nardo, Nancy E Lane, Neeta Parimi, Peggy M. Cawthon, Bo Fan, John Shepherd, Jane Cauley, Audrey Zucker-Levin, Rachel A. Murphy, Wendy B. Katzman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN.: A descriptive study of the association between diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) and kyphosis. OBJECTIVE.: To investigate the association of DISH with Cobb angle of kyphosis in a large cohort of older subjects from the Health Aging and Body Composition Study. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA.: DISH and thoracic kyphosis are well-defined radiographical findings in spines of older individuals. Characteristics of DISH (ossifications between vertebral segments) reflect changes of spine anatomy and physiology that may be associated with Cobb angle of kyphosis. METHODS.: Using data from 1172 subjects aged 70 to 79 years, we measured DISH and Cobb angle of kyphosis from computed tomographic lateral scout scans. Characteristics of participants with and without DISH were assessed using the and t tests. Association between DISH and Cobb angle was analyzed using linear regression. Cobb angle and DISH relationship was assessed at different spine levels (thoracic and lumbar). RESULTS.: DISH was identified on computed tomographic scout scan in 152 subjects with 101 cases in only the thoracic spine and 51 in both thoracic and lumbar spine segments. The mean Cobb angle of kyphosis in the analytic sample was 31.3° (standard deviation = 11.2). The presence of DISH was associated with a greater Cobb angle of 9.1° and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) (5.6-12.6) among African Americans and a Cobb angle of 2.9° and 95% CI (0.5-5.2) among Caucasians compared with those with no DISH. DISH in the thoracic spine alone was associated with a greater Cobb angle of 10.6° and 95% CI (6.5-14.7) in African Americans and a Cobb angle of 3.8° and 95% CI (1.0-6.5) in Caucasians compared with those with no DISH. CONCLUSION.: DISH is associated with greater Cobb angle of kyphosis, especially when present in the thoracic spine alone. The association of DISH with Cobb angle is stronger within the African American population.Level of Evidence: 3.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E1418-E1424
JournalSpine
Volume39
Issue number24
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 15 2014

Keywords

  • aging
  • bone metabolism
  • Cobb angle
  • computed tomography
  • diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis
  • DISH
  • hyperkyphosis
  • kyphosis
  • race
  • spine
  • spine ligament

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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