Differential sensitivity of culture and the polymerase chain reaction for detection of feline herpesvirus 1 in vaccinated and unvaccinated cats

Jane E Sykes, G. F. Browning, G. Anderson, V. P. Studdert, H. V. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The diagnostic sensitivities of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and culture were compared and correlated with clinical signs in 5 vaccinated cats and 3 unvaccinated cats that were experimentally infected with feline herpesvirus 1. Conjunctival swabs were taken each day from 0 to 14 days and on 21,28 and 30 days after challenge. PCR (49.3%) was significantly more sensitive than culture (30.1%) as assessed by an adjusted McNemar's test to account for non-independence of results between days within each cat (P = 0.02). PCR was considerably more sensitive (34.1%) than culture (8.2%) in vaccinated cats (P=0.001), whereas there was no significant difference ill sensitivities in the unvaccinated cats, where the sensitivity of PCR was 74.5% and that of culture was 66.7% (P=0.17). In vaccinated cats showing clinical signs, the sensitivities of culture and PCR were 14.8% and 55.6% respectively(P = 0.03), whereas in unvaccinated cats the sensitivities were 80.6% and 96.8% respectively (P=0.07). This study suggests that disease due to feline herpesvirus 1 has been significantly underdiagnosed, particularly in vaccinated cats.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)65-74
Number of pages10
JournalArchives of Virology
Volume142
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Herpesviridae
Felidae
Cats
Polymerase Chain Reaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

Cite this

Differential sensitivity of culture and the polymerase chain reaction for detection of feline herpesvirus 1 in vaccinated and unvaccinated cats. / Sykes, Jane E; Browning, G. F.; Anderson, G.; Studdert, V. P.; Smith, H. V.

In: Archives of Virology, Vol. 142, No. 1, 1997, p. 65-74.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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