Differential effects of aging on dendritic spines in visual cortex and prefrontal cortex of the rhesus monkey

M. E. Young, D. T. Ohm, D. Dumitriu, P. R. Rapp, John Morrison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aging decreases the density of spines and the proportion of thin spines in the non-human primate (NHP) dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC). In this study, we used confocal imaging of dye-loaded neurons to expand upon previous results regarding the effects of aging on spine density and morphology in the NHP dlPFC and compared these results to the effects of aging on pyramidal neurons in the primary visual cortex (V1). We confirmed that spine density, and particularly the density of thin spines, decreased with age in the dlPFC of rhesus monkeys. Furthermore, the average head diameter of non-stubby spines in the dlPFC was a better predictor than chronological age of the number of trials required to reach criterion on both the delayed response test of visuospatial working memory and the delayed nonmatching-to-sample test of recognition memory. By contrast, total spine density was lower on neurons in V1 than in dlPFC, and neither total spine density, thin spine density, nor spine size in V1 was affected by aging. Our results highlight the importance and selective vulnerability of dlPFC thin spines for optimal prefrontal-mediated cognitive function. Understanding the nature of the selective vulnerability of dlPFC thin spines as compared to the resilience of thin spines in V1 may be a promising area of research in the quest to prevent or ameliorate age-related cognitive decline.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)33-43
Number of pages11
JournalNeuroscience
Volume274
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 22 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Dendritic Spines
Visual Cortex
Prefrontal Cortex
Macaca mulatta
Spine
Primates
Neurons
Pyramidal Cells
Short-Term Memory
Cognition

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Dendritic spines
  • Macaque
  • Prefrontal cortex
  • Visual cortex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Differential effects of aging on dendritic spines in visual cortex and prefrontal cortex of the rhesus monkey. / Young, M. E.; Ohm, D. T.; Dumitriu, D.; Rapp, P. R.; Morrison, John.

In: Neuroscience, Vol. 274, 22.08.2014, p. 33-43.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Young, M. E. ; Ohm, D. T. ; Dumitriu, D. ; Rapp, P. R. ; Morrison, John. / Differential effects of aging on dendritic spines in visual cortex and prefrontal cortex of the rhesus monkey. In: Neuroscience. 2014 ; Vol. 274. pp. 33-43.
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