Differential contributions of cognitive and motor component processes to physical and instrumental activities of daily living in Parkinson's disease

Deborah Cahn-Weiner, Edith V. Sullivan, Paula K. Shear, Adolf Pfefferbaum, Gary Heit, Gerald Silverberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

99 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) become dependent upon caregivers because motor and cognitive disabilities interfere with their ability to carry out activities of daily living (ADLs). However, PD patients display diverse motor and cognitive symptoms, and it is not yet known which are most responsible for ADL dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to identify the contributions that specific cognitive and motor functions make to ADLs. Executive functioning, in particular sequencing, was a significant independent predictor of instrumental ADLs whereas simple motor functioning was not. By contrast, simple motor functioning, but not executive functioning, was a significant independent predictor of physical ADLs. Dementia severity, as measured by the Dementia Rating Scale, was significantly correlated with instrumental but not physical ADLs. The identification of selective relationships between motor and cognitive functioning and ADLs may ultimately provide a model for evaluating the benefits and limitations of different treatments for PD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)575-583
Number of pages9
JournalArchives of Clinical Neuropsychology
Volume13
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Activities of Daily Living
Parkinson Disease
Exercise
Dementia
Neurobehavioral Manifestations
Aptitude
Cognition
Caregivers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Differential contributions of cognitive and motor component processes to physical and instrumental activities of daily living in Parkinson's disease. / Cahn-Weiner, Deborah; Sullivan, Edith V.; Shear, Paula K.; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Heit, Gary; Silverberg, Gerald.

In: Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, Vol. 13, No. 7, 01.10.1998, p. 575-583.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cahn-Weiner, Deborah ; Sullivan, Edith V. ; Shear, Paula K. ; Pfefferbaum, Adolf ; Heit, Gary ; Silverberg, Gerald. / Differential contributions of cognitive and motor component processes to physical and instrumental activities of daily living in Parkinson's disease. In: Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology. 1998 ; Vol. 13, No. 7. pp. 575-583.
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