Differences in the metabolism of oxidatively modified low density lipoprotein and acetylated low density lipoprotein by human endothelial cells

inhibition of cholesterol esterification by oxidatively modified low density lipoprotein

I. Jialal, A. Chait

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51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The rate of degradation of oxidatively modified low density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) by human endothelial cells was similar to that of unmodified low density lipoprotein (LDL), and was approximately 2-fold greater than the rate of degradation of acetylated LDL (Ac-LDL). While LDL and Ac-LDL both stimulated cholesterol esterification in endothelial cells, Ox-LDL inhibited cholesterol esterification by 34%, demonstrating a dissociation between the degradation of Ox-LDL and its ability to stimulate cholesterol esterification. Further, while LDL and Ac-LDL resulted in a 5- and 15-fold increase in cholesteryl ester accumulation, respectively, Ox-LDL caused only a 1.3-fold increase in cholesteryl ester mass. These differences could be accounted for, in part, by the reduced cholesteryl ester content of Ox-LDL. However, when endothelial cells were incubated with Ac-LDL in the presence and absence of Ox-LDL, Ox-LDL led to a dose-dependent inhibition of cholesterol esterification without affecting the degradation of Ac-LDL. This inhibitory effect of Ox-LDL on cholesteryl ester synthesis was also manifest in normal human skin fibroblasts incubated with LDL and in LDL-receptor-negative fibroblasts incubated with unesterified cholesterol to stimulate cholesterol esterification. Further, the lipid extract from Ox-LDL inhibited cholesterol esterification in LDL-receptor negative fibroblasts. These findings suggest that the inhibition of cholesterol esterification by oxidized LDL is independent of the LDL and scavenger receptors and may be a result of translocation of a lipid component of oxidatively modified LDL across the cell membrane.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1561-1568
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Lipid Research
Volume30
Issue number10
StatePublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

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Lipoproteins
Esterification
Endothelial cells
LDL Lipoproteins
Metabolism
Endothelial Cells
Cholesterol
Cholesterol Esters
LDL Receptors
Fibroblasts
Degradation
LDL Cholesterol
acetyl-LDL
Lipids
Scavenger Receptors
Cell membranes
Skin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology

Cite this

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title = "Differences in the metabolism of oxidatively modified low density lipoprotein and acetylated low density lipoprotein by human endothelial cells: inhibition of cholesterol esterification by oxidatively modified low density lipoprotein",
abstract = "The rate of degradation of oxidatively modified low density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) by human endothelial cells was similar to that of unmodified low density lipoprotein (LDL), and was approximately 2-fold greater than the rate of degradation of acetylated LDL (Ac-LDL). While LDL and Ac-LDL both stimulated cholesterol esterification in endothelial cells, Ox-LDL inhibited cholesterol esterification by 34{\%}, demonstrating a dissociation between the degradation of Ox-LDL and its ability to stimulate cholesterol esterification. Further, while LDL and Ac-LDL resulted in a 5- and 15-fold increase in cholesteryl ester accumulation, respectively, Ox-LDL caused only a 1.3-fold increase in cholesteryl ester mass. These differences could be accounted for, in part, by the reduced cholesteryl ester content of Ox-LDL. However, when endothelial cells were incubated with Ac-LDL in the presence and absence of Ox-LDL, Ox-LDL led to a dose-dependent inhibition of cholesterol esterification without affecting the degradation of Ac-LDL. This inhibitory effect of Ox-LDL on cholesteryl ester synthesis was also manifest in normal human skin fibroblasts incubated with LDL and in LDL-receptor-negative fibroblasts incubated with unesterified cholesterol to stimulate cholesterol esterification. Further, the lipid extract from Ox-LDL inhibited cholesterol esterification in LDL-receptor negative fibroblasts. These findings suggest that the inhibition of cholesterol esterification by oxidized LDL is independent of the LDL and scavenger receptors and may be a result of translocation of a lipid component of oxidatively modified LDL across the cell membrane.",
author = "I. Jialal and A. Chait",
year = "1989",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "30",
pages = "1561--1568",
journal = "Journal of Lipid Research",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Differences in the metabolism of oxidatively modified low density lipoprotein and acetylated low density lipoprotein by human endothelial cells

T2 - inhibition of cholesterol esterification by oxidatively modified low density lipoprotein

AU - Jialal, I.

AU - Chait, A.

PY - 1989

Y1 - 1989

N2 - The rate of degradation of oxidatively modified low density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) by human endothelial cells was similar to that of unmodified low density lipoprotein (LDL), and was approximately 2-fold greater than the rate of degradation of acetylated LDL (Ac-LDL). While LDL and Ac-LDL both stimulated cholesterol esterification in endothelial cells, Ox-LDL inhibited cholesterol esterification by 34%, demonstrating a dissociation between the degradation of Ox-LDL and its ability to stimulate cholesterol esterification. Further, while LDL and Ac-LDL resulted in a 5- and 15-fold increase in cholesteryl ester accumulation, respectively, Ox-LDL caused only a 1.3-fold increase in cholesteryl ester mass. These differences could be accounted for, in part, by the reduced cholesteryl ester content of Ox-LDL. However, when endothelial cells were incubated with Ac-LDL in the presence and absence of Ox-LDL, Ox-LDL led to a dose-dependent inhibition of cholesterol esterification without affecting the degradation of Ac-LDL. This inhibitory effect of Ox-LDL on cholesteryl ester synthesis was also manifest in normal human skin fibroblasts incubated with LDL and in LDL-receptor-negative fibroblasts incubated with unesterified cholesterol to stimulate cholesterol esterification. Further, the lipid extract from Ox-LDL inhibited cholesterol esterification in LDL-receptor negative fibroblasts. These findings suggest that the inhibition of cholesterol esterification by oxidized LDL is independent of the LDL and scavenger receptors and may be a result of translocation of a lipid component of oxidatively modified LDL across the cell membrane.

AB - The rate of degradation of oxidatively modified low density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) by human endothelial cells was similar to that of unmodified low density lipoprotein (LDL), and was approximately 2-fold greater than the rate of degradation of acetylated LDL (Ac-LDL). While LDL and Ac-LDL both stimulated cholesterol esterification in endothelial cells, Ox-LDL inhibited cholesterol esterification by 34%, demonstrating a dissociation between the degradation of Ox-LDL and its ability to stimulate cholesterol esterification. Further, while LDL and Ac-LDL resulted in a 5- and 15-fold increase in cholesteryl ester accumulation, respectively, Ox-LDL caused only a 1.3-fold increase in cholesteryl ester mass. These differences could be accounted for, in part, by the reduced cholesteryl ester content of Ox-LDL. However, when endothelial cells were incubated with Ac-LDL in the presence and absence of Ox-LDL, Ox-LDL led to a dose-dependent inhibition of cholesterol esterification without affecting the degradation of Ac-LDL. This inhibitory effect of Ox-LDL on cholesteryl ester synthesis was also manifest in normal human skin fibroblasts incubated with LDL and in LDL-receptor-negative fibroblasts incubated with unesterified cholesterol to stimulate cholesterol esterification. Further, the lipid extract from Ox-LDL inhibited cholesterol esterification in LDL-receptor negative fibroblasts. These findings suggest that the inhibition of cholesterol esterification by oxidized LDL is independent of the LDL and scavenger receptors and may be a result of translocation of a lipid component of oxidatively modified LDL across the cell membrane.

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