Dietary Selenium Intake Modulates Thyroid Hormone and Energy Metabolism in Men

Wayne Chris Hawkes, Nancy L. Keim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Most studies of selenium and thyroid hormone have used sodium selenite in rats. However, rats regulate thyroid hormone differently, and selenite, which has unique pharmacologic activities, does not occur in foods. We hypothesized that selenium in food would have different effects in humans. Healthy men were fed foods naturally high or low in selenium for 120 d while confined to a metabolic research unit. Selenium intake for all subjects was 47 μg/d (595 nmol/d) for the first 21 d, and then changed to either 14 (n = 6) or 297 (n = 5) μg/d (177 nmol/d or 3.8 μmol/d) for the remaining 99 d, causing significant changes in blood selenium and glutathione peroxidase. Serum 3,3′,5-triiodothyronine (T3) decreased in the high selenium group, increased in the low selenium group, and was significantly different between groups from d 45 onward. A compensatory increase of thyrotropin occurred in the high selenium group as T3 decreased. The changes in T3 were opposite in direction to those reported in rats, but were consistent with other metabolic changes. By d 64, the high selenium group started to gain weight, whereas the low selenium group began to lose weight, and the weight changes were significantly different between groups from d 92 onward. Decreases of serum T3 and compensatory increases in thyrotropin suggest that a subclinical hypothyroid response was induced in the high selenium group, leading to body weight increases. Increases of serum T 3 and serum triacylglycerol accompanied by losses of body fat suggest that a subclinical hyperthyroid response was induced in the low selenium group, leading to body weight decreases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3443-3448
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume133
Issue number11
StatePublished - Nov 2003

Fingerprint

hormone metabolism
thyroid hormones
Selenium
Thyroid Hormones
energy metabolism
Energy Metabolism
selenium
triiodothyronine
blood serum
thyrotropin
Thyrotropin
Serum
Food
rats
Body Weight
Sodium Selenite
Selenious Acid
Weights and Measures
sodium selenite
selenites

Keywords

  • Body weight
  • Energy metabolism
  • Selenium
  • Thyroid
  • Thyrotropin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Dietary Selenium Intake Modulates Thyroid Hormone and Energy Metabolism in Men. / Hawkes, Wayne Chris; Keim, Nancy L.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 133, No. 11, 11.2003, p. 3443-3448.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hawkes, WC & Keim, NL 2003, 'Dietary Selenium Intake Modulates Thyroid Hormone and Energy Metabolism in Men', Journal of Nutrition, vol. 133, no. 11, pp. 3443-3448.
Hawkes, Wayne Chris ; Keim, Nancy L. / Dietary Selenium Intake Modulates Thyroid Hormone and Energy Metabolism in Men. In: Journal of Nutrition. 2003 ; Vol. 133, No. 11. pp. 3443-3448.
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