Dietary preference for sweet foods in patients with dementia

Dan M Mungas, J. K. Cooper, P. G. Weiler, D. Gietzen, C. Franzi, C. Bernick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using a telephone survey, patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (n = 31) and vascular dementia (n = 14) were compared with elderly normal controls (n = 43) in preferences for different foods. Patients with Alzheimer's disease had a greater preference than normal controls for relatively high-fat, sweet foods and for high-sugar, low-fat foods, but did not significantly differ in preference for other foods, including those high in complex carbohydrates and protein. Vascular dementia patients showed a similar pattern, not significantly different from that for Alzheimer's patients. Results did not consistently support a hypothesis that increased sweet preference is a nonspecific form of disinhibited behavior related to declining mental status, nor was a hypothesis relating sweet preference to serotonin activity within the brain consistently supported. Results provide preliminary evidence that craving for sweet food may be a significant part of the clinical syndrome of dementia, but further research is needed to delineate the psychological and biological mechanisms accounting for it.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)999-1007
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume38
Issue number9
StatePublished - 1990

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Food Preferences
Dementia
Vascular Dementia
Food
Alzheimer Disease
Fats
Telephone
Serotonin
Carbohydrates
Psychology
Brain
Research
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Mungas, D. M., Cooper, J. K., Weiler, P. G., Gietzen, D., Franzi, C., & Bernick, C. (1990). Dietary preference for sweet foods in patients with dementia. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 38(9), 999-1007.

Dietary preference for sweet foods in patients with dementia. / Mungas, Dan M; Cooper, J. K.; Weiler, P. G.; Gietzen, D.; Franzi, C.; Bernick, C.

In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Vol. 38, No. 9, 1990, p. 999-1007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mungas, DM, Cooper, JK, Weiler, PG, Gietzen, D, Franzi, C & Bernick, C 1990, 'Dietary preference for sweet foods in patients with dementia', Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, vol. 38, no. 9, pp. 999-1007.
Mungas DM, Cooper JK, Weiler PG, Gietzen D, Franzi C, Bernick C. Dietary preference for sweet foods in patients with dementia. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. 1990;38(9):999-1007.
Mungas, Dan M ; Cooper, J. K. ; Weiler, P. G. ; Gietzen, D. ; Franzi, C. ; Bernick, C. / Dietary preference for sweet foods in patients with dementia. In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. 1990 ; Vol. 38, No. 9. pp. 999-1007.
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