Dietary patterns and longitudinal change in hip bone mineral density among older men

for the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study Research Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Summary: Studying dietary patterns is often more informative than individual nutrients or foods. We found that a Prudent dietary pattern (rich in vegetables and fish) was associated with reduced loss of total hip BMD in older men. A Prudent dietary pattern may be a potential lifestyle strategy for minimizing bone loss. Introduction: This study aimed to identify baseline dietary patterns using factor analysis in a cohort of older men and to evaluate whether the dietary patterns were associated with bone mineral density change (%ΔBMD) at the total hip and femoral neck over time. Methods: Participants (n = 4379; mean age 72.9 ± 5.5 years) were from the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) prospective cohort study and had dietary data collected at baseline (March 2000–April 2002) and BMD measured at baseline and Visit 2 (March 2005–May 2006). Dietary intake was assessed with a brief Block food frequency questionnaire (FFQ); factor analysis was used to derive dietary patterns. BMD was measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA); %ΔBMD was calculated from baseline to Visit 2. We used generalized linear regression to estimate least square (LS) means of %ΔBMD in quartiles of the dietary pattern scores adjusted for potential confounding factors. Results: Two major dietary patterns were derived: Prudent (abundant in vegetables, salad, and non-fried fish) and Western (rich in hamburger, fries, processed meats, cheese, and sweets/desserts). There was an inverse association between adherence to the Prudent pattern and total hip %ΔBMD (p-trend = 0.028 after adjusting for age and clinical site; p-trend = 0.033 after further adjustment for smoking, calcium supplement use, diabetes, hypertension, and total energy intake). No other consistent associations between dietary patterns and %ΔBMD were observed. Conclusions: Greater adherence to a Prudent dietary pattern may attenuate total hip BMD loss (%ΔBMD) in older men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1135-1145
Number of pages11
JournalOsteoporosis International
Volume29
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

Fingerprint

Pelvic Bones
Bone Density
Hip
Food
Vegetables
Statistical Factor Analysis
Fishes
Osteoporotic Fractures
Femur Neck
Cheese
Energy Intake
Least-Squares Analysis
Meat
Life Style
Linear Models
Cohort Studies
Smoking
X-Rays
Prospective Studies
Hypertension

Keywords

  • BMD change
  • Dietary pattern
  • Factor analysis
  • Older men
  • Prudent
  • Western

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Dietary patterns and longitudinal change in hip bone mineral density among older men. / for the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study Research Group.

In: Osteoporosis International, Vol. 29, No. 5, 01.05.2018, p. 1135-1145.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

for the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study Research Group 2018, 'Dietary patterns and longitudinal change in hip bone mineral density among older men', Osteoporosis International, vol. 29, no. 5, pp. 1135-1145. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00198-018-4388-x
for the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study Research Group. / Dietary patterns and longitudinal change in hip bone mineral density among older men. In: Osteoporosis International. 2018 ; Vol. 29, No. 5. pp. 1135-1145.
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abstract = "Summary: Studying dietary patterns is often more informative than individual nutrients or foods. We found that a Prudent dietary pattern (rich in vegetables and fish) was associated with reduced loss of total hip BMD in older men. A Prudent dietary pattern may be a potential lifestyle strategy for minimizing bone loss. Introduction: This study aimed to identify baseline dietary patterns using factor analysis in a cohort of older men and to evaluate whether the dietary patterns were associated with bone mineral density change ({\%}ΔBMD) at the total hip and femoral neck over time. Methods: Participants (n = 4379; mean age 72.9 ± 5.5 years) were from the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) prospective cohort study and had dietary data collected at baseline (March 2000–April 2002) and BMD measured at baseline and Visit 2 (March 2005–May 2006). Dietary intake was assessed with a brief Block food frequency questionnaire (FFQ); factor analysis was used to derive dietary patterns. BMD was measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA); {\%}ΔBMD was calculated from baseline to Visit 2. We used generalized linear regression to estimate least square (LS) means of {\%}ΔBMD in quartiles of the dietary pattern scores adjusted for potential confounding factors. Results: Two major dietary patterns were derived: Prudent (abundant in vegetables, salad, and non-fried fish) and Western (rich in hamburger, fries, processed meats, cheese, and sweets/desserts). There was an inverse association between adherence to the Prudent pattern and total hip {\%}ΔBMD (p-trend = 0.028 after adjusting for age and clinical site; p-trend = 0.033 after further adjustment for smoking, calcium supplement use, diabetes, hypertension, and total energy intake). No other consistent associations between dietary patterns and {\%}ΔBMD were observed. Conclusions: Greater adherence to a Prudent dietary pattern may attenuate total hip BMD loss ({\%}ΔBMD) in older men.",
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AU - for the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study Research Group

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AU - Harrison, S.

AU - Judd, S.

AU - Orwoll, E. S.

AU - Marshall, L. M.

AU - Shannon, J.

AU - Langsetmo, L.

AU - Lane, Nancy E

AU - Shikany, J. M.

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