Dietary management of diabetes mellitus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dietary therapy should be designed to enhance insulin therapy and improve glycaemic regulation of the diabetic dog and cat. Dietary therapy will not alleviate the necessity for insulin therapy in dogs and cats with insulin‐dependent diabetes mellitus. Preliminary work suggests that dietary therapy may ultimately be the only therapy necessary to maintain glycaemic control in cats with suspected non‐insulin‐dependent diabetes mellitus. Currently, the feeding of a high fibre, high complex carbohydrate diet is recommended at a caloric intake designed to correct obesity and maintain ideal bodyweight. Several small meals should be fed during the period of insulin activity, to help minimise post prandial fluctuations in the blood glucose concentration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)213-217
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Small Animal Practice
Volume33
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1992

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diet therapy
diabetes mellitus
Diabetes Mellitus
cats
therapy dogs
glycemic control
Cats
Insulin
blood glucose
Meals
energy intake
obesity
dietary fiber
insulin
Therapeutics
Dogs
carbohydrates
therapeutics
body weight
dogs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Small Animals

Cite this

Dietary management of diabetes mellitus. / Nelson, Richard W.

In: Journal of Small Animal Practice, Vol. 33, No. 5, 1992, p. 213-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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