Dietary macronutrient composition influences tissue trace element accumulation in diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats

M. H. Oster, J. Y. Uriu-Hare, C. L. Trapp, J. S. Stern, Carl L Keen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of the present investigation was to study the role of two potential contributory factors, hyperphagia and alterations in fuel metabolism, on the development of tissue trace element accumulation in the experimentally induced diabetic rat. The role of increased mineral intake associated with diabetic hyperphagia on tissue trace element accumulation was evaluated by feeding control and diabetic rats high-carbohydrate (HC) diets which varied in Zn, Cu, Mn, and Mg concentrations. Diabetic rats were hyperphagic and had lower plasma Mg, and higher liver Zn, Cu, and Mn concentrations than control rats, regardless of dietary mineral intake. In a second study, diabetic hyperphagia was reduced by feeding control and diabetic rats a HC, high-fat (HF), or high-protein (HP) diet; the effects of altering diabetic metabolism on trace element status was studied. Liver Mn and Zn concentrations of diabetic rats fed the HF diet were lower than diabetic rats fed the HC diet and HP diet, and were similar to control rats. Liver Cu concentrations of diabetic rats fed the HF and HP diets were lower than diabetic rats fed the HC diet and were similar to control rats. While diabetic rats, in general, had higher plasma glucagon concentrations and lower percent body fat than control rats, diabetic rats fed the HF diet had similar plasma glucagon and percent body fat to control rats. These data suggest that tissue-specific biochemical needs, such as the need for metals as cofactors for enzymes, rather than hyperphagia per se, may drive the accumulation of trace elements in the diabetic animal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)67-75
Number of pages9
JournalProceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine
Volume207
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

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