Dietary intake of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and the risk of primary cardiac arrest

David S. Siscovick, T. E. Raghunathan, Irena King, Sheila Weinmann, Viktor E. Bovbjerg, Lawrence Kushi, Leonard A. Cobb, Michael K. Copass, Bruce M. Psaty, Rozenn Lemaitre, Barbara Retzlaff, Robert H. Knopp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

118 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Whether the dietary intake of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) from seafood reduces the risk of ischemic heart disease remains a source of controversy, in part because studies have yielded inconsistent findings. Results from experimental studies in animals suggest that recent dietary intake of long-chain n-3 PUFAs, compared with saturated and monounsaturated fats, reduces vulnerability to ventricular fibrillation, a life-threatening cardiac arrhythmia that is a major cause of ischemic heart disease mortality. Until recently, whether a similar effect of long-chain n-3 PUFAs from seafood occurred in humans was unknown. We summarize the findings from a population-based case-control study that showed that the dietary intake of long-chain n-3 PUFAs from seafood, measured both directly with a questionnaire and indirectly with a biomarker, is associated with a reduced risk of primary cardiac arrest in humans. The findings also suggest that 1) compared with no seafood intake, modest dietary intake of longchain n-3 PUFAs from seafood (equivalent to 1 fatty fish meal/wk) is associated with a reduction in the risk of primary cardiac arrest; 2) compared with modest intake, higher intakes of these fatty acids are not associated with a further reduction in such risk; and 3) the reduced risk of primary cardiac arrest may be mediated, at least in part, by the effect of dietary n3 PUFA intake on cell membrane fatty acid composition. These findings also may help to explain the apparent inconsistencies in earlier studies of long-chain n-3 PUFA intake and ischemic heart disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume71
Issue number1 SUPPL.
StatePublished - Jan 2000
Externally publishedYes

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cardiac arrest
Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Heart Arrest
omega-3 fatty acids
Seafood
polyunsaturated fatty acids
food intake
seafoods
myocardial ischemia
Myocardial Ischemia
risk reduction
Fatty Acids
fatty fish
arrhythmia
Ventricular Fibrillation
Risk Reduction Behavior
case-control studies
monounsaturated fatty acids
fish meal
Meals

Keywords

  • Arrythmia
  • Cardiac arrest
  • Diet
  • Ischemic heart disease
  • n-3 Fatty acids
  • Risk factors
  • Sudden death

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Siscovick, D. S., Raghunathan, T. E., King, I., Weinmann, S., Bovbjerg, V. E., Kushi, L., ... Knopp, R. H. (2000). Dietary intake of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and the risk of primary cardiac arrest. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 71(1 SUPPL.).

Dietary intake of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and the risk of primary cardiac arrest. / Siscovick, David S.; Raghunathan, T. E.; King, Irena; Weinmann, Sheila; Bovbjerg, Viktor E.; Kushi, Lawrence; Cobb, Leonard A.; Copass, Michael K.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Lemaitre, Rozenn; Retzlaff, Barbara; Knopp, Robert H.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 71, No. 1 SUPPL., 01.2000.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Siscovick, DS, Raghunathan, TE, King, I, Weinmann, S, Bovbjerg, VE, Kushi, L, Cobb, LA, Copass, MK, Psaty, BM, Lemaitre, R, Retzlaff, B & Knopp, RH 2000, 'Dietary intake of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and the risk of primary cardiac arrest', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 71, no. 1 SUPPL..
Siscovick DS, Raghunathan TE, King I, Weinmann S, Bovbjerg VE, Kushi L et al. Dietary intake of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and the risk of primary cardiac arrest. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2000 Jan;71(1 SUPPL.).
Siscovick, David S. ; Raghunathan, T. E. ; King, Irena ; Weinmann, Sheila ; Bovbjerg, Viktor E. ; Kushi, Lawrence ; Cobb, Leonard A. ; Copass, Michael K. ; Psaty, Bruce M. ; Lemaitre, Rozenn ; Retzlaff, Barbara ; Knopp, Robert H. / Dietary intake of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and the risk of primary cardiac arrest. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2000 ; Vol. 71, No. 1 SUPPL.
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