Dietary intake of energy and animal foods and endometrial cancer incidence: The lowa women's health study

Wei Zheng, Lawrence H. Kushi, John D. Potter, Thomas A. Sellers, Timothy J. Doyle, Roberd M. Bostick, Aaron R. Folsom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

67 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To assess the relations of dietary intake of energy and animal foods to endometrial cancer risk, dietary analyses were performed using data from a prospective cohort study of over 23,000 postmenopausal Iowa women who responded to a mailed questionnaire in 1986 and were followed through the end of 1992 for cancer incidence and total mortality. Usual intakes of 127 food items were measured by a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. After 7 years of follow-up, 216 incident endometnal cancer cases had been ascertained. There was no statistically significant association of dietary intake of energy and most animal foods with endometrial cancer incidence over the 7-year follow-up period. Stratified analyses, however, suggested that intake of energy from plant foods may be inversely associated with endometrial cancer risk in the latter years of follow-up (trend test, p= 0.03), while high intake of energy and foods from animal sources related to slightly, but not statistically significantly, elevated risks of this cancer in the earlier years of follow-up. The only significant dose-response relation observed in food group analyses was for processed meat and fish, for which a significant 50% excess risk of endometrial cancer was found among women in the highest versus the lowest tertile of intake. This study suggests that dietary intake of energy and most animal foods is not related to or is only weakly related to the risk of endometrial cancer among postmenopausal US women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)388-394
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume142
Issue number4
StatePublished - Aug 15 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Women's Health
Endometrial Neoplasms
Energy Intake
Food
Incidence
Eating
Food Analysis
Neoplasms
Edible Plants
Meat
Fishes
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies
Mortality
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Diet
  • Fats
  • Nutrition
  • Prospective studies
  • Risk factors
  • Uterine neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Zheng, W., Kushi, L. H., Potter, J. D., Sellers, T. A., Doyle, T. J., Bostick, R. M., & Folsom, A. R. (1995). Dietary intake of energy and animal foods and endometrial cancer incidence: The lowa women's health study. American Journal of Epidemiology, 142(4), 388-394.

Dietary intake of energy and animal foods and endometrial cancer incidence : The lowa women's health study. / Zheng, Wei; Kushi, Lawrence H.; Potter, John D.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Doyle, Timothy J.; Bostick, Roberd M.; Folsom, Aaron R.

In: American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 142, No. 4, 15.08.1995, p. 388-394.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zheng, W, Kushi, LH, Potter, JD, Sellers, TA, Doyle, TJ, Bostick, RM & Folsom, AR 1995, 'Dietary intake of energy and animal foods and endometrial cancer incidence: The lowa women's health study', American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 142, no. 4, pp. 388-394.
Zheng W, Kushi LH, Potter JD, Sellers TA, Doyle TJ, Bostick RM et al. Dietary intake of energy and animal foods and endometrial cancer incidence: The lowa women's health study. American Journal of Epidemiology. 1995 Aug 15;142(4):388-394.
Zheng, Wei ; Kushi, Lawrence H. ; Potter, John D. ; Sellers, Thomas A. ; Doyle, Timothy J. ; Bostick, Roberd M. ; Folsom, Aaron R. / Dietary intake of energy and animal foods and endometrial cancer incidence : The lowa women's health study. In: American Journal of Epidemiology. 1995 ; Vol. 142, No. 4. pp. 388-394.
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